Career change

Workplace issues including management skills, personal effectiveness, motivation and personal development / self improvement.

Postby Mary » Sun Apr 25, 2004 1:20 pm

I am a licensed, practicing architect and have been thinking about a career change to some sort of psycology field for some time. Architecture is a miserable profession. I don't know exactly what field, but therapy vs. some type of research appeals to me.

Has anyone made this type of change in mid-life? I'd like to hear anyone's thoughts on making this change and thoughts on this profession in general.

Thanks in advance.
Mary
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Postby Dot_Bigger_than_the_World » Sun Apr 25, 2004 2:51 pm

Hello Mary !
My name is Lucian and i am from Romania. I have been a programmer for like 7 years now and i have been working in the field for about 2 years.
Programming is great for me , yet i recently found somethings that give me more excitement - psychology related stuff. So , i have began reading , searching , finding , exploring , learning about many extremely interesting stuff that blow my mind. I am think seriously to quit my job (that is extremely time consuming) and to dedicate myself to studying pyschology and to start learning better for university (i am a freshman).
My advice , if you can call it that, is to see what things you really want to do in your life. ( a quote from a film : << do take all the krap you if know you won't enjoy the ride >> ).
If you are financial independent ( meaning you don't worry about the next paycheck ) than go for what you really like ; if not try to figure out a plan on where you will get money and how will you make time to learn what you really like.

the best of luck ,
lucian
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Postby Becky Vaughn » Tue May 04, 2004 9:36 pm

This may not quite qualify as a complete career change, since what I originally started out doing is related to what I am doing now. However, millions of years ago, I was a medic and spent 4 years at med school in London before giving it all up to go travelling in the States where I spent far too many years splitting my time between hanging around as a beach bum, working as a waitress, moonlighting as a paramedic, then as a secretary / PA for pharmaceuticals company, then as a research assistant in psychology, before qualifying as a psychotherapist (dynamic, analytical, CBT/REBT, and humanistic approaches). Now I'm back in the UK in the second year of my MRes in Psychology at Manchester Uni.

What do you not enjoy about working as an architect? And what appeals to you about psychology / psychotherapy?
Becky Vaughn
 

Postby Macdonut » Tue Jun 22, 2004 5:22 pm

So far I've been an Infantryman in the Army, a Despatch Rider, a Driver, a Web Designer, self-employed, unemployed, worked on a farm, a Park Keeper and a crewman - not in that order, and the real list is probably quite a bit longer. In the search for something I really enjoy doing I have tried quite a few things and always find that the next thing I do is normally immeasurably more enjoyable than the previous, and normally pays better as well. Whilst many are happy to settle in one field, I am not. However, I do suspect (tell me if I'm wrong!) that many people feel obliged to stay in the field in which they started. Considering that we spend 8 hours (or more) a day working and 8 hours (or less) a day sleeping, we invariably have very little time left to ourselves - which is why I stick with my philosophy as far as work goes.

If psychology is really the route you want to go, then continue to work towards your goal. Just an idea, but have you considered helping out with counselling in your spare time, to get a real feel for it?
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Postby Alyssa22 » Mon Sep 06, 2004 3:51 pm

I just graduated from computer programming like 2 weeks ago and i hate it...i just studied it because my parents said there's good money....but what i really love and loved since i was 10 years old is phsychology...i use to read phsychology books when i was 11-12....
I posting this because I'm also thinking of changing my career to phscyhology but i have no money right now to start university again....I often think at 22 i'm too old to start a new career and go back to school...what do you think? should i save some money and persue the career of my dreams? I heard it takes more than 10 years to get your masters degree in phsychology? is it true? any advice?
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Postby Graham Firth » Mon Sep 06, 2004 4:06 pm

Hi Alyssa

You are certainly not too old at 22.

I think it's worth bearing in mind that you will spend a very large percentage of your time at work during your working life. Wouldn't it be great if you spent that time doing something you enjoy - as you put it, the career of your dreams.

Why don't you look into it and see how practical it is before making your mind up. There are all sorts of areas of psychology you can work in without having to spend 10 years getting a masters degree (although if you're really interested those 10 years may be really rewarding and enjoyable for you).

Graham
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Postby Lyndsay Swinton » Tue Sep 07, 2004 10:00 am

Hi Alyssa,

Just a thought about how to make the switch to psychology.....how about combining your computer skills and knowledge with a medical career? It is easier to cross over careers when you "blend" the old with the new, getting your foot in the door.

How about looking for a job in the medical profession which related to IT e.g. in the UK there is a mega project kicking off in the National Health Service (NHS) about making all patient records electronic.

Changing careers and pursuing your life's "dream" requires a bit of lateral thought, so don't think that the only way to do what you want to do is by going straight back to college.

Any job will give you an insight into "psychology" as no matter where you work, or who you work with, there will be "people stuff" that you can use as "case studies". Maybe consider evening classes or part time study as an option.

Let us know how you go.

Regards
Lyndsay
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Postby Lyndsay Swinton » Tue Sep 14, 2004 2:01 pm

Hi,

Thought you might like to take a look at a new article on my site, all about midlife career change.

Midlife Career Change

"It's never too late for a midlife career change. Vincent Van Gogh was an art dealer, schoolmaster, student priest, and missionary before he taught himself how to paint!"
Regards
Lyndsay
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Postby dEviL's aDvocAtE » Tue Sep 21, 2004 4:35 pm

1. What skills and experience do you posess?

All those that are possessed the majority of the population.

2. What field would you like to work in?

If I knew that, I would already be working in that field and I wouldn't be here.

3. What lifestyle do you want?

Lots of free time.
Lots of money.
Travelling to exotic new places.
Dealing with people.
Doing something for the benefit of people.
Interesting and worthwhile work.

4. Where do you want to live?

Not in a big polluted city.

5. What salary fits your lifestyle?

£30k min, although the more the better.

6. What career progression exists?

With regard to what career?

7. How will you progress this?

If I knew that I wouldn't be here. Since, I'm hoping that this isn't the first time that you've dealt with this, I was hoping that you suggest ways of progressing and the pros and cons of each. Supplying some industry contacts would also be useful.
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Postby Lyndsay Swinton » Wed Sep 29, 2004 11:34 am

Hi Devi's Advocate,

Welcome to the forum and thank you for your post.

Since, I'm hoping that this isn't the first time that you've dealt with this, I was hoping that you suggest ways of progressing and the pros and cons of each.


Yes, I have given career advice before and I'll give the same advice to you as I would to most people - I'm afraid it's back to the drawing board for you! Your answers to the thought provoking questions seem rushed and non specific, so go through the questions again, more slowly, and with a bit more convinction. There will be skills and experiences that you have that are unique to you, not as "possessed by the majority of the population". (Would you write this on your CV? :wink: )
Supplying some industry contacts would also be useful.
How can I do that if I don't know what industry you are interested in :wink: Seriously, there is generic advice on all the big job hunting sites e.g. Monster which may give you the specifics you are after.

If you are truely stuck about what field to work in, maybe get in contact with a careers advice centre and do a profiling test. This is usually a series of questions about your likes and dislikes and will give back a range of suggested fields to work in.

Regards
Lyndsay
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Postby dEviL's aDvocAtE » Thu Sep 30, 2004 11:39 am

Lyndsay Swinton wrote:Welcome to the forum and thank you for your post.

Yes, I have given career advice before and I'll give the same advice to you as I would to most people - I'm afraid it's back to the drawing board for you! Your answers to the thought provoking questions seem rushed and non specific, so go through the questions again, more slowly, and with a bit more convinction. There will be skills and experiences that you have that are unique to you, not as "possessed by the majority of the population". (Would you write this on your CV? :wink: )


Thank you for the welcome and for being prepared to follow through on my non-specific responses. As you may have guessed, I am frustrated. Skillwise, I'm not too concerned about that at this stage. Just assume, I'm above average on the population graph. More interested in passion in emotion and where my heart lies. This is area of my frustration.

Draw 3 overlapping circles - skills, passions, life aims. The overlapping bit in the middle is what I can't work out - skills are as clear as day but the passions bit is murkier than murk. Don't want to me in an area where I'm utilising my 'developed' skills if this is at the expense of passion. Unless of course, its £megabucks p/a.

Lyndsay Swinton wrote:How can I do that if I don't know what industry you are interested in :wink: Seriously, there is generic advice on all the big job hunting sites e.g. Monster which may give you the specifics you are after.

If you are truely stuck about what field to work in, maybe get in contact with a careers advice centre and do a profiling test. This is usually a series of questions about your likes and dislikes and will give back a range of suggested fields to work in.


Done all that and more. Still none the wiser.

The Head of People Development at my organisation ran down the corrider screaming after my MBTI test. The woman from the Careers Centre was useless along with her computer program:-

Her: What are your hobbies?
Me: Er, dunno. I spend time on my PC and I like gizmos and gadgets. I like tennis and football too.
Her: Well, you're not probably not good enough to be an pro tennis player or football player. How about going into IT?
* prints out a load of IT job vancanies *
Me: Thinks 'f***. I hate all this itty bitty data and logic computer science stuff'

The PC from the 2nd Careers Centre printed out about 100 jobs anything from agricultural scientist to hairdresser. The Parachute book was basic beyond belief, the websites are interesting but focus more on areas that people have already decided on. Martha Beck's book is brilliant but I'm stuck in one of the sections, so can't quite move on to the next stage.

A key part of the jigsaw is still missing. Can't figure it what.
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Postby Lyndsay Swinton » Thu Sep 30, 2004 12:44 pm

http://www.socal.com/artman/publish/article_461.shtml

Here is one of thousands of articles on how to find your passion. You'll probably hate all of them but hey, you never know....

Without wanting to sound like Yoda from Star Wars - the only person that can find your passion is you. There are no books out there that will tell you what your passion is. There are no websites out there that will tell you what your passion is. What you will find is advice on how to figure it out. It's up to you to take the time and effort to do so. There is also no right answer, and the answer can change. Sounds hard? I guess that's life :wink:

Lyndsay
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Postby vegetablevn » Sat Oct 02, 2010 3:23 pm

[quote="Lyndsay Swinton"]

Here is one of thousands of articles on how to find your passion. You'll probably hate all of them but hey, you never know....

Without wanting to sound like Yoda from Star Wars - the only person that can find your passion is you. There are no books out there that will tell you what your passion is. There are no websites out there that will tell you what your passion is. What you will find is advice on how to figure it out. It's up to you to take the time and effort to do so. There is also no right answer, and the answer can change. Sounds hard? I guess that's life :wink:

Lyndsay[/quote]

Hi everybody,

You can see same topic at the side bar of this site. You can find out some thing same your questions or use search box or this site.

Best rgs
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