Careers in Hypnotherapy

Postby cunnerz » Mon Oct 13, 2003 3:19 am

Hypnosis has always intrigued me and I was amazed by a recent TV documentary about a particular Spanish surgeon. He uses Hypnotherapy instead of anasthetic and it showed a woman having a leg operation whilst appearing to be awake!
This apparent power of the mind inspired me to book a hypnotherapy weekend workshop (for November) at Uncommon Knowledge. I'm already curious about hypnotherapy as a career and am aware of the Diploma course. What I would like to know is how easy or realistic is it to start practising with just a Diploma or are there many other qualifications required? Most Hypnotherapists advertising in the Yellow Pages seem to have several qualifications.
I'm 38 years old and work in Television so I'm looking for a complete change and hope age is an asset.

All comments appreciated.

Andy Cunningham, Brighton
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Postby Roger Elliott » Mon Oct 13, 2003 8:06 am

Welcome to the forums Andy! I'm going to leave this question to some of the people on the forum who have trained with us and subsequently set up in practice. It's going to sound better if it doesn't come from me. ;)

Best

Roger
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Postby cunnerz » Mon Oct 13, 2003 7:16 pm

Good answer Roger! Look forward to meeting you and receiving other replies. Andy :)
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Postby Anthony Jacquin » Mon Oct 13, 2003 8:49 pm

My advice would be treat this like any other career move, do yur research, ratify your interest (by doing a weekender as you have suggested) or talking with a hypnotherapist then get some good quality training.

If you are serious about it then hypnotherapy can be a wonderful opportunity for career change and yes you can get started after what can seem like quite minimal training. So much of what you learn on long courses is history and fluff that is interesting but not much use in a day to day hypnotherapy business. Certainly you can start working confidently with just a diploma as long as the training is of a high standard. When you are involved with a body of thewrapists you can always refer if a client approaches you and you feel out of your depth.

My advice would be decide on an area that interest you most then focus on it. Most hypnotherapists find the 'bread and butter' clients want to get rid of habits, phobias and lose weight - lots more you can do but this just seems to be what general public consider hypnotherapists for, so it is useful to do a course that enables you to deal with that.

There is no need to be put of by the therapists will spaghetti alphabet after their name - there are a lot of course junkies :shock: out there.

That said there is always more to learn!
But that is no reason to not start practising immediately.
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Postby Anthony Jacquin » Mon Oct 13, 2003 10:15 pm

By the way I am not an Uncommon Therapy trained therapist - but I hear it is a great training!
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Postby cunnerz » Mon Oct 13, 2003 11:23 pm

Thanks for the info Anthony, certainly food for thought :!:
Do most hypnotherapists work from home or is a shared practice in a commercial property more the norm :?: I imagine hypnotherapy as being a somewhat solitary but extremely rewarding profession when helping people to overcome major problems in their lives. Is this a fair assumption :?:
Andy
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Postby Louise McDermott » Tue Oct 14, 2003 12:59 pm

Hi Andy,

Welcome to the forum :) I know I'm from Uncommon Knowledge, but I couldn't resist telling you about some of my experiences from doing the diploma course myself this year, plug plug . . .

It's just that you mentioned how being a therapist could be quite solitary and it does seem like it could get that way.

On the diploma, we were heavily encouraged from the outset to get into practise groups, to discuss and practise hypnosis on a regular basis.

I can't tell you how helpful that has been, and there's a clear difference in ability between those who have done that and those who haven't.

But to get back to the point, we are carrying on our weekly group meetings, to discuss clients that we see and therapy in general. I can't imagine having done the course without that support and chance to ask questions and opinions and to trry out differnet techniques, etc.

So that's one way of easing any feelings of solitude, although I know that it wouldn't fully compensate for say, a team of work colleagues. However, like you've mentioned, you can always set up in practise with others, either as a company or a co-operative or whatever you like really.

But just so that you know, there are many like minded people who do our course, and I'm sure you'd find that with other training courses too.

Hope this helps :wink:

Louise
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Postby cunnerz » Thu Oct 16, 2003 2:15 am

Thanks Louise for your comments, I'm currently on nights at the moment and that gets very solitary I can tell you!! Looking forward to the weekend workshop. Andy
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Postby Louise McDermott » Thu Oct 16, 2003 11:50 am

Well that's a pleasure, Andy :)

Oh the joys of night shifts, eh?

Well, I do hope you thoroughly enjoy the workshop . . .

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