Weed for 20 years

Postby Addictedforyears » Tue Aug 24, 2010 10:18 am

Hey All.

I have been smoking weed pretty much everyday for 20 years.
I know it has stopped me from being the best that I can be but has also not stopped me from being pretty successful.
I have now come to that point in my life where most of my friends have quit and I find myself lying and running around just to have a smoke.
I have always loved the comfort of weed and no matter what was happening in my life It was always there to turn to. I could also spend night after night on my own being really antisocial not bothered to go out and see anyone just because I liked the companionship of the weed and was happy to sit and get stoned.
I really need to slow down and make smoking a treat not a necessity.
It is great to see i'm not on my own and would welcome the help and chat from anyone that has been in as is still in the same boat as me.
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#1

Postby Toker » Tue Aug 24, 2010 10:50 am

I am the same.... 20 years of it and it used to be me and all my mates sitting arouns smoking and laughing about everything but now it is my own little secret!
I also feel that I have not done as well or made choices as well as I could. The fact I don't live on the street and can still sorta function normally makes it hard to say it is a real problem but it depends how you feel in your head I guess?!

U sought this site so maybe you feel there is some down sides now to smoking....can u see yourself being old and smoking still??

Take it easy...and yes, you are certainly not alone!!
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#2

Postby Addictedforyears » Tue Aug 24, 2010 11:09 am

Thanks Toker
Good to hear from you.
Yes I definitely feel there are some down sides but just maybe not enough for me to totally quit although you are right, I don't see myself as an old man having a smoke now and then. Im sure I will eventually quit the green monster i'm just not sure when and how.
Thanks for your support though mate good to know i'm not alone.
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#3

Postby icet » Tue Aug 24, 2010 11:09 am

You guys have been smoking for quite a long time. There have been significant biochemical changes in your brain and throughout your body as a result of that. I'm no physician, but "moderation" with pot may not be possible when you've been using it for this long, it may be all or none.

That being said, giving it up is definately not impossible. You guys just need to find the right motivation to do so. Perhaps it would be a good idea to make a list of reasons why you want to stop, be it financial, mental, social, and compare it to reasons why you continue smoking. Maybe then you will find the will you need to succeed.

I wish you all the best, and remember it's never too late to turn your life around for the better. You are not alone.
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#4

Postby Addictedforyears » Tue Aug 24, 2010 11:29 am

Thanks alot Ice
I have tried writing down all the reasons for quitting and I sit there and read them knowing that I really should quit, I just never get round to actually doing it.
Im having a baby in 6 months so I really am hoping that I can focus all my energy into that and not the weed.
I know I can turn this all around and hearing the positive comments really does help a lot but as you say after 20 years its not gonna be easy.
Thanks again
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#5

Postby AstroLady » Tue Aug 24, 2010 11:55 am

I think a lot of people after 20 or more years of use probably experience the same thing you do, Addictedforyears. The whole thing of having the friends who you used to smoke with quit and you feel left behind, so you still sneak around in order to get the smoke. Think of it this way. If you quit, you'll be able to hang out with some of those friends again, and you'll find your relationships have depth to them without the smoking.

Right now I'm 27 (been smoking since 15 with only a month's break or so here and there, never any longer than that), so a few of my friends still smoke. I'm wondering how many of us will still be smoking in our 30's and onward. I will say that the group of my still-smoking friends is dwindling as a few more of them quit every year. I just don't want to get left behind I guess. I don't want to be hanging out and feeling like I have to leave early so I can go get blazed.

Unlike your stereotypical situation with stoners, I haven't befriended people based on our habit alone. I have to have more in common and a deeper connection with someone than our drug of choice to call them my friend. Also my best female friend is a non-stoner and has never even tried it. Sorry, I'm kind of rambling off topic here, but I just wanted to illustrate that those connections you had may still be there without the weed.

Since you're about to become a parent, I'd say quitting soon or now would be your best bet. Your son or daughter will have a more present parent if you're not stoned (I say this as a kid who had a perpetually stoned dad). Also, if some of your ex-stoner friends also have kids, there's another excuse to get together with them so you can socialize with them and your kids can all play together. Actually some of my best childhood memories are of my mom and stepdad's friends coming over with their kids (who also became my friends). Think of how cool that could be.

I wish you the best of luck. Check out the "Best of Quitters Wisdom" threads. They are excellent and I'm finding even more inspiration in them. It's definitely not going to be easy after 20 years, but I think it will be worth it. I'm in the process of cutting down this week by only taking a couple of hits every night (and waiting until as late as possible to do it), and then giving my "accessories" away to a new home on Friday night - too broke to buy new implements for smoking should I be tempted, so I'm thinking giving the stuff away will be a good way to ensure I don't backtrack (and I've asked the person I am giving them to NOT to give them back to me no matter what, even if I ask). Saturday is going to be my first day sober since my last attempt at quitting about 6 months ago. I'm done marinating in resin and coughing up phlegm when I'm not even sick. I'm sick of the groggy, fog feeling when it wears off and having to refresh it. I would continue writing the list of "cons" about being a stoner, and you may find in time that it highly outweighs the "pros" especially as you get older. That being said, you have to do it in your own time.

I thought I could be a "treat smoker" too. Each time I've tried quitting, it's been the "treat smoke" that's gotten me back into buying a bag for myself and going right back into the daily habit. I would love to be one of those people who could just smoke a few times a year or whatever, but I just can't. I have finally come to that conclusion. I'm not saying that'll be you, but after 20 years you may have to just forego it, even as a treat. That being said, I think the feelings of a natural high just from enjoying life may actually be better once you've been quit for awhile! :)

Peace, love, and good luck! Keep reading and posting. I've been reading the posts here for a couple of weeks while mulling over my decision to quit for good, then I just joined a few days ago. In that short time, this forum and the people on it have been a great motivator for me. Hopefully this can be a helpful place for you, too!
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#6

Postby icet » Tue Aug 24, 2010 12:46 pm

There's a lot of good advice from AstroLady.

I've been smoking pot the last two years and I really feel that it was just so I could self medicate to treat my depression/anxiety. I realized drugs are not the ****ing answer, they are a crutch and just make you feel worse in the end when you eventually stop them. In fact they probably made my symptoms worse.

Exercise definately helps, and I'm not talking about a pansy stroll around the block. Do something intense, for at least an hour, something that makes you break into a hard sweat. Otherwise you're not releasing nearly as many endorphins as you could be into your blood stream. Also, watch your diet closely. You'd be surprised how greatly you're emotions can be affected by what you eat. Take a multivitamin. Stay away from greasy fatty foods, they are no good. You're brain is mostly fat and can definately be affected by them. Eat fruits and veggies and lots of them. Hell they even help you crap better.

Surround yourself with positive people that care about you and **** everyone else. Find all the reasons you are grateful to be alive such as your family and friends. They wont be around forever and when they are gone you don't want to regret not being able to spend quality time with them just because you were high all the time.

Sorry if I sound aggressive but I just want you guys to know that it is possible to feel 100% normal again. I'm on Day 7 of not smoking and I feel my withdrawal symptoms decreasing with each passing day. Exercise was critical for me, I started P90X. The intense workouts cause me to break into a hard sweat and feel nauseous afterwards, but I also feel pretty amazing when I'm done. I think it has to do with runners high.

Addictedforyears, if you have a baby on the way now you have other people's lives that depend on you. I'm not judging you, but smoking while pregnant is definately not good for the baby. You don't want to be responsible for harming your child before it's even born do you? Again I don't want you to feel bad, but think of your baby as a blessing. It may give you that extra push you need to finally quit.
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#7

Postby Addictedforyears » Tue Aug 24, 2010 1:41 pm

Hey Astro Lady and Icet
Thank you both for your REAL advice. It is so nice to be able to chat openly and hear the truth be it good or bad.
I know and understand everything you are both saying and truly know you are both 100% right.
Its gonna be a long hard road but I do know its worth the fight and having a baby on the way is the best motivation in the world.
I am definitely up for the training as I'd love to get back to the way I used to be as a fit sport loving guy.
Ice whats this P90x?
Love to all x
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#8

Postby AstroLady » Tue Aug 24, 2010 1:44 pm

icet wrote:There's a lot of good advice from AstroLady.

I've been smoking pot the last two years and I really feel that it was just so I could self medicate to treat my depression/anxiety. I realized drugs are not the ****ing answer, they are a crutch and just make you feel worse in the end when you eventually stop them. In fact they probably made my symptoms worse.

Exercise definately helps, and I'm not talking about a pansy stroll around the block. Do something intense, for at least an hour, something that makes you break into a hard sweat. Otherwise you're not releasing nearly as many endorphins as you could be into your blood stream. Also, watch your diet closely. You'd be surprised how greatly you're emotions can be affected by what you eat. Take a multivitamin. Stay away from greasy fatty foods, they are no good. You're brain is mostly fat and can definately be affected by them. Eat fruits and veggies and lots of them. Hell they even help you crap better.

Surround yourself with positive people that care about you and **** everyone else. Find all the reasons you are grateful to be alive such as your family and friends. They wont be around forever and when they are gone you don't want to regret not being able to spend quality time with them just because you were high all the time.

Sorry if I sound aggressive but I just want you guys to know that it is possible to feel 100% normal again. I'm on Day 7 of not smoking and I feel my withdrawal symptoms decreasing with each passing day. Exercise was critical for me, I started P90X. The intense workouts cause me to break into a hard sweat and feel nauseous afterwards, but I also feel pretty amazing when I'm done. I think it has to do with runners high.

Addictedforyears, if you have a baby on the way now you have other people's lives that depend on you. I'm not judging you, but smoking while pregnant is definately not good for the baby. You don't want to be responsible for harming your child before it's even born do you? Again I don't want you to feel bad, but think of your baby as a blessing. It may give you that extra push you need to finally quit.


You give great advice as well, icet! Exercise is a great way to get a natural high from endorphins. My cardio of choice is lap swimming - with the money I'll save from not buying weed I can afford to join a gym with a pool and go swimming every day if I wish...how cool!
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#9

Postby wakinglife » Tue Aug 24, 2010 3:07 pm

Wow! I am so impressed by this thread. There is such a sense of community and mutual support on this forum. Let's keep it going! :)
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#10

Postby Addictedforyears » Tue Aug 24, 2010 3:14 pm

We will definitely keep this going.

A quote to believe in:

The glory of friendship is not the outstretched hand, nor the kindly smile nor the joy of companionship; it is the spiritual inspiration that comes to one when he discovers that someone else believes in him and is willing to trust him.

Ralph Waldo Emerson
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#11

Postby wakinglife » Tue Aug 24, 2010 3:18 pm

Addictedforyears wrote:The glory of friendship is not the outstretched hand, nor the kindly smile nor the joy of companionship; it is the spiritual inspiration that comes to one when he discovers that someone else believes in him and is willing to trust him.

Ralph Waldo Emerson


Thanks, Addictedforyears! I'm going to quote your quote. :lol:
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#12

Postby Addictedforyears » Wed Aug 25, 2010 8:54 am

Waking life I just read your link on another forum mentioning all the benefits of being off weed and you are soooooo right.
I am looking forward to feeling all of them and hope with the help of all the good people on here I can do it.

Thanks
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#13

Postby icet » Wed Aug 25, 2010 11:13 am

Remember, it's probably not gonna be easy, but it does get better with time and in the end it's so worth it. I actually feel like the "natural high" of life is finally coming back to me.
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#14

Postby redcurls » Wed Aug 25, 2010 6:54 pm

Now I've decided to stop - again- after 7 years smoking daily pretty much I am so scared I wont ever just enjoy chilling out at home on an evening without it. I cant imagine thinking oooh I'm so looking forward to tonight, without those few joints. I can go out a couple of nights but I cant every night (married 2 kids) so the nights in watching TV or reading etc will be horrible without weed....I think. I LOVE that feeling of having a joint and relaxing. However I am 31, have 2 kids, cant at all really afford to buy that much dope, blah blah usual. I just relly need some reassurance that I will one day soon? look forward to a nice evening without my faithful crutch!
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