Nlp Success stories?

Hypnosis / Self Hypnosis - discuss this most useful, and misunderstood, of therapeutic tools.

Postby Matthew W » Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:52 pm

Will anybody share some storys of there experiance with nlp and how it has been usefull to them or helping sombody else?

I have heard so many claims of greatness to nlp but never really heard anyone saying it worked for them.

Thankyou.
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Postby Anthony Jacquin » Wed Nov 03, 2004 7:52 pm

Interesting that you should ask. I am following a thread on a hypnosis group where a hypnotist posed the same question.


The only people I know who make good use of NLP are good hypnotists. Without the hypnosis what is left?

Ant
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Postby Matthew W » Wed Nov 03, 2004 11:02 pm

A bad hypnotist perhaps.

Being more specific. Fast Phobia cures... I have a phobia of needles myself. Due to illness a child I was forced to have frequent blood tests. I obviously put up the biggest fight I could... but I was often overpowered and forced to have blood taken. Since then I have a strong phobia of needles and cant have blood taken or donate it.

So when sombody claims that they have a 5 minuit fix it draws suspicion. I guess I was just looking to find sombody who has been in a similar position.
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Postby Anthony Jacquin » Thu Nov 04, 2004 7:00 am

Mathew,

the fast phobia cure works. I have helped many many people with it - yes it took slightly longer than 5 minutes because i put them in a trance before I ran that particular technique.

Most phobias are learnt very quickly, they can be unlearnt or learnt in a new way very quickly too.

If spped of result makes you suspicious ask your practitioner to take all the time you wish.

Ant
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Postby Tino » Fri Nov 05, 2004 4:16 am

I used to be a proponent of NLP because I was swayed by all of the hype.

Then I went to a cognitive-behavioral therapist and picked up "Feeling Good" by David Burns and that was 100 times better than anything I had gotten from NLP.

So, I began to look for any scientific support for NLP and could not find any. What research I did find did not support NLP.

I'd suggest trying something more mainstream first. Then if that doesn't work, maybe you can try NLP, but don't expect the miracles that purveyors of NLP would like you to believe.

-Tino
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Postby Matthew W » Fri Nov 05, 2004 2:53 pm

Tino: Thank you for your reply. I dont personally feel that the book would be suitable to me. I dont have depression problems and am generally upbeat. Although I do appreicate you taking the time to reccomend it to me.

My understanding of NLP is very limited at the moment. It seems to be gain the trust and a dominant position with the patient and then try to shape there attitude and way of dealing with the situations that cause troubles.

Is this an accurate mentality of NLP?
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Postby Michael Lank » Fri Nov 05, 2004 3:28 pm

Hi Matthew,

If you're interested in NLP I'd highly recommend the 1 day course run by ITS, Ian McDermott is an excellent trainer. They've a course on 27 November.
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Postby Tino » Fri Nov 05, 2004 6:04 pm

Matthew,

I think that book is helpful for people also for people who are not suffering from depression.

Another book I just thought of that is quite interesting and based on principles confirmed by experimentation is called "Influence: The psychology of persuasion" by Robert Cialdini. Like many NLP developers, Cialdini has also observed many persuasion professionals and come to some different principles than those of the NLP folks.

-Tino
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Postby Anthony Jacquin » Fri Nov 05, 2004 9:42 pm

Mathew,

I think you are getting closer by focusing on the attiude and mentality that is behind NLP rather than the techniques.

Bandler the co-founder of NLP once defined it as 'an attiude that leaves behind a trail of techniques'

At first I found this to be of limited use and like most people focused on that trail of techniques. They can still be effective, however if you are really interested i suggest you look at the assumptio0ns the attitude is developed from. Once that is in place you will realise why you can expect rapid change.

The dry application of a technique is not as effective as realy understanding what a person is capable of and showing them that.

NLP is not about dominating another, rather it is about empowering them and giving them more choices than they currently operate with.

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Postby Matthew W » Wed Nov 10, 2004 6:34 pm

Thanks for the replys guys.

Im still curious why nobody has come forward to give an account of how NLP helped them.
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Postby Seraph Clear » Fri Nov 12, 2004 6:55 am

There may not be a quantitative way of saying how it helps. Through NLP one tries to improve themselves by modeling others' behaviours on success, rapport, body language, "influencing skills", etc and it would be difficult to seperate out a specific instance of progression because overall life experience is directly involved.

I have Introduction to NLP by Joseph O'Connor & John Seymour; Thorsons 1995 London. Here's an excerpt from the back cover giving their explanation of what NLP is - "Some people appear more gifted than others. NLP, one of the fastest growing developments in applied Psychology, describes in simple terms what they do differently , and enables you to learn these patterns of excellence. This approach gives the practical skills used by outstanding communicators. Excellent communication is the basis of creating excellent results. NLP skills are proving invaluable for personal development and professional excellence in counseling, education and business."

Sounds pretty vague and honestly it's one of those books that sounded great then sat on my bookshelf 'til now! lol
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Postby Matthew W » Fri Nov 12, 2004 11:31 am

NLP seems great at being indirect...

You never actually said if it made any difference in YOUR life.
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Postby Joseph Kao » Tue Nov 16, 2004 12:06 am

Richard Bandler - NLP co-founder - places great emphasis on people learning to generate intense, exhilarating body feelings at will.

In therapeutic, remedial terms, you can "anchor" these states to parts of your life that ain't so great yet. This will dilute what limiting states you may have felt in those situations and give you a choice of feeling and acting in another way.

Much more profound however, (and here I shift from the second person "you" to the first person "I" - this is a personal experience Matthew!) is learning to feel good more and more. To learn to enjoy what I already enjoy more and more and with more humour, delight and fire.

NLP doesn't "do this". You do it, perhaps with someone's help, perhaps without. But the attitude you have, or that person, has is paramount to effecting a change.

It might seem I'm focussing on something overly simple here. After all, isn't NLP about subtle linguistic tricks, moving and shifting mental images, covertly eliciting peoples values and "meta-programs" and then sneakily touching their knee to "anchor" it? Well, all of those are tools that are part of the NLP model but...

...without a powerful intention, a drive, a purpose, NLP becomes mental masturbation or worse. All of the little bits and pieces of NLP only come together with that direction, that humour, that curiosity, and that strong belief in people's ability to learn, not intellectually, but learning anything and everything at a basic behavioural level.

The methodology, the NLP model's way of approaching consciousness and mental and behavioural patterns, comes second. Finally, as Anthony highlighted, comes the trail of techniques. And if you can't profoundly affect another or yourself and lead them into a state of laughter, or yearning, or delight, or hope, using your voice tone and facial expressions or gestures, then any "swish pattern" or "anchoring" you attempt will be consistently and systematically ignored by your brain. The neural stimulus you create in that person or yourself will have the same level of impact as the slightly irritating buzz a fly makes in the corner of the room.

Imagine a computer engineer with fantastic knowledge and a box of precision made tools at hand, but an inability to even turn a screwdriver. He kind of scratches the screw a little and then sighs.

So to answer the original question, using NLP and having trained in it has been a major factor in keeping my sense of humour about me (and there's a nice ambiguity in that phrase) and quite literally learning to expand my range of feeling good, for a good few years now. The refinements and subtleties of it, and how to be a little more covert with people when necessary, are what I'm still learning.
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Postby Seraph Clear » Tue Nov 16, 2004 2:02 am

I agree with what Joseph said 'NLP doesn't "do this". You do it...'

So yes, it is indirect and may not even be provable or quantitative as mentioned before, on the other hand are you familiar with the "Sullivan Nod"?

It's a marketing technique where you ask a question with the expectation the other person will say yes and while making eye contact you are nodding your head in agreement. This allows for a weeker mind to say YES just for agreement sake without even wondering if they wanted that bottle of wine or to pay 28,000 for that car.

There have been many studies showing that this type of human interaction works. I feel NLP is in the same boat. Sometimes subleminal, sometimes tricky, and many times manipulative and leading - wouldn't you agree?
*nodding* :)
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Postby Michael Lank » Tue Nov 16, 2004 9:03 am

Hi Seraph Clear,

You describe NLP as 'sometimes tricky, and many times manipulative and leading' what specifically about NLP fits that description?

In my experience it's people that are 'tricky' and 'manipulative', not NLP.
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