My Quit Weed Journey

#15

Postby VaxR » Fri Dec 22, 2017 3:18 am

Soulfull,

Wow man! 3 month and 4 month, THAT'S REALLY FANTASTIC! Proud of you! I feel like you really have done it already. Especially hanging on to a back up stash for soooo long. Truly amazing. You really make the goal sound attainable. Honestly i am surprised to see you still coming around and posting here after that accomplishment, but it is certainly appreciated at least by me. I am sure there are others who pass through here and don't post also, so HUGE props on your continued support.

I have found reevaluating how i view life has also provided some support for myself in this journey. I don't know if you are familiar, but there is a few chaps by the name of Alan Watts, Terrence McKenna, and Carl Jung who are great and amazing thinkers of the past. Some of their videos really put a different light on life and what is truly important! These guys can even help expand the mind of just normal people, not in any dire conflict or challenge of quitting a substance. If these names are new to you, i highly suggest checking out some of their videos on youtube, especially if you have a lot of free time on your hands.

Anyway just got home from work and have a double tomorrow, thanks for the congratulations and wish you all the best during these upcoming holidays. It certainly does help to occupy my mind with work and isn't too shabby on the bank account either!

Cheers and merry Christmas (if it pertains),

Vax
VaxR
New Member
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2017 4:55 am
Likes Received: 0


#16

Postby SoulFull » Tue Dec 26, 2017 3:27 pm

Hey VaxR, will check out the people you've suggested in your last post. I've heard some lectures of Alan Watts on youtube before and the reason for that is I happen to read a post by wakinglife, a veteran poster here mentioning his name. Will look up the others when I get back. Thanks for your suggestion. Currently on the island of Langkawi. Wife taking a few days off until the new year so we've decided to have a family vacation.

Just an update on how I'm feeling getting closer to the 3 month mark of quitting. No urge to smoke at all. None. Going on holiday used to be me smoking more than usual to enhance the blissful feelings. This is the first time in so many years that I go on holiday totally sober. Not feeling that I'm missing out on any high though. The sunset by the beach still looked beautiful these past two days. And we were able to spend time together without me having to run off somewhere to smoke or to get intoxicated whenever the high ran out. It is like I'm a totally different person now. I can accept whatever feelings that I naturally have on an as is basis. There is no need for enhancements on the way I truly feel with the use of substances. And to me this is a good thing.

Peace everyone. Have a happy new year! May our new year's resolutions include beating our addictions forever. Have to go now. Will keep updating for the greater good of mankind (and myself whenever I start to forget the struggles and glories I went through for this quit) every chance I can :D

Good luck
User avatar
SoulFull
Junior Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:06 am
Likes Received: 38

#17

Postby VaxR » Mon Jan 01, 2018 4:49 pm

Soulfull,

Thats really awesome bro! I know it was difficult to take extended vacations for myself in the past just because i wanted to catch that buzz, but it is very uncomfortable to ask complete strangers where I could find buds! Sometimes it was easy, other times and anxiety situation. Glad you were able to go and have a nice time without that.

Just keep on trudging through this haze, it cannot last forever...hope everyone has a great holiday and happy new year!

Cheers
VaxR
New Member
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2017 4:55 am
Likes Received: 0

#18

Postby SoulFull » Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:53 am

3 months off weed
4 months off cigarettes
This will be a long one.

As I begin to write this, it is currently 6.48 a.m. here. For the fist time in my life, I am waking up at 5 am every morning, I prepare breakfast and then do some prayer/meditation with my wife before she leaves for work. Starting to enhance my spirituality practices. It was something I did before I replaced it with weed years ago. I'm really happy that my decision to stop smoking brought me back to this peaceful tranquil and calming activity I used to love. I thank a lot of people here for mentioning meditation as part as their recovery activity. Sometimes I get to include some light workout in the morning, but I usually do this in the afternoon.

VaxR, how are you doing mate? Just wanted to let you know that wherever you are, you're in my thoughts and prayers. We can do this. No matter what the obstacles, and how heavy and overwhelming it may feel sometimes, we CAN. I was never a believer in myself and my capabilities. Especially not without the euphoria of weed and ciggs! Something has changed from deep inside. I don't know what. But something natural.

I haven't been working out recently (dumbbell weight lifting, pushups, squats, sit ups etc) but have been reading a lot. I'm also taking omega3 and Vitamin C+Zinc supplements daily. Not yet taking the B vitamins recommended by many here. (Supplements can be pricey for someone who's not working LOL so will probably buy them later this month) Also I have included baked beans in my diet early in the morning and more recently, green olives. Will do some excercize later this afternoon to further strengthen myself. Being a 34 year old man with two kids, I need to be strong. Both mentally and physically, so having some muscles on me won't hurt right? :D

The boost of dopamine from workouts also give me so much positivity especially when I jump rope for about 300++ times or so. How funny is that? All this time I went to look for positivity in a roll which I burned then inhaled, where all I needed to do was jump around over a plastic rope for a few minutes until some sweat came out. It's so funny, until it is not. How much of my life I've wasted to finally figure this out. Well, trying not to look back too much. Rebuilding myself a day at a time, and the past to me now merely serves as a reference of what to maintain or deconstruct. Dwelling to much there upsets me. Focusing on the now.

Has it been smooth and easy? No. No sugar coating here. It's hard. Even after reaching the 3 month mark and returning home to reality from an awesome holiday on a tropical island with loved ones, my emotions were still in state of chaos. My biggest obstacle was my anxiety. I cried upon returning from my holiday because I still felt anxious beyond imagining. And then I realized the urgency to find some technique to overcome this anxiety. So I started to read a lot. Digging for answers.

I found it. It has worked for me the past 2 days. Upon applying the technique, I lived fearless for 2 days. It is now 8.44 a.m. I've been writing for 2 hours and find that I am starting to lose focus. Let me re-energize for a while before sharing this on my next post. I feel it is important to have my full focus before writing this tip so that you really feel what I'm going to say and share.

Heads up!
User avatar
SoulFull
Junior Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:06 am
Likes Received: 38

#19

Postby SoulFull » Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:31 am

SoulFull wrote:

My biggest obstacle was my anxiety. I cried upon returning from my holiday because I still felt anxious beyond imagining. And then I realized the urgency to find some technique to overcome this anxiety. So I started to read a lot. Digging for answers.

I found it. It has worked for me the past 2 days. Upon applying the technique, I lived fearless for 2 days. It is now 8.44 a.m. I've been writing for 2 hours and find that I am starting to lose focus. Let me re-energize for a while before sharing this on my next post. I feel it is important to have my full focus before writing this tip so that you really feel what I'm going to say and share.


To continue where I left off, I found a way to control my anxiety. It may seem silly, but this technique worked for me:

Whenever I feel anxious, where a sudden grip of fear takes hold of me, I try to imagine in my mind, the subject that is causing me fear to be a MONSTER. It's not hard to see the relation, because that's what monsters do, they strike fear due to its hideous figure and the potential damage it can inflict. Notice that I used the word "potential". This is something unconfirmed and may not even be real. Who made this potential damage real? Where is it real? In the mind. My mind. Then if it is not real outside of my mind, why do I fear it?

I try to picture the monster as graphic as possible, having characteristics that are similar to the actual thing that is causing me fear. For example, let's say that the subject that is causing me anxiety is an ex-customer /seller that is threatening to make a police report against me for the fault of another party and himself and not the fault of my own. This is the subject of anxiety. Although I know that I have nothing to fear, I can't help it. That is what I go through when I experience anxiety.

So what I do now is, I change the subject into a monster in my mind. I imagine the monster to have jail cells as its body, wearing a police man's hat and sunglasses. Also I will attach the faces of the person threatening me as well as the third person involved in this ordeal on the monster's shoulders with eyes flaming and long tongues sticking out of their mouths full of sharp fangs to make the monster look as scary as possible. Then I will imagine the size of the monster to represent the level of fear I feel towards it. If I'm stressed out of my wits, I will imagine the monster to be huge. Larger than a city.

Now, I imagine myself. I look heroic. A fearless warrior. Somewhat angry at this beast for rampaging through this city of my mind causing destruction of all sorts. So I imagine myself jumping and then flying towards the monster at jet like speed. Then I swing my fist and deliver a punch, destroying it. With just one punch, the monster dies. No more fear. Back to reality.

In reality, after the fear is gone, I took action. I called both the ex-customer/seller as well as the 3rd person involved in this ordeal and helped settled the matter eventhough I didn't have to. The 3rd person promised to settle the issue by this week. And the ex customer/seller seems to appreciate my helping hand although at 1st he was accusing me and blaming me for things that happened.

Before my quit smoking journey, I settled problems with a smoke. Now, I have learned a new way to overcome the crippling anxiety that immobilize me from taking any action to settle my problems. This technique can be done in just a few seconds. Try to take deep breathes while doing this.

It's certainly a morale boost. I'm gaining confidence. The fearless warrior i imagined in my mind is becoming real.

Getting stronger every day.
User avatar
SoulFull
Junior Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:06 am
Likes Received: 38

#20

Postby SoulFull » Sun Jan 07, 2018 12:17 pm

I would like to share that I am starting to feel comfortable around people. This weekend I went to a family reunion to celebrate my uncle's 59th birthday at a countryside resort where my uncle rented two villas. Me and my wife and kids got a room in one of those villas which we shared with other uncles and aunts and their kids who are my cousins. I'm the only nephew with with kids currently. This is like a yearly event but the last time my wife and I participated was in 2013, before I got heavily hooked to weed where I'd smoke non stop throughout the day.

My uncle was so surprised that he thanked me so many times for coming. He didn't expect me to come as I had a reputation of turning down invitations from family members since the last 5 years or so. Nobody knows about my addiction other than my siblings, wife and mom, who was also there. I finally confessed to my mom about my addiction a month ago, and I still don't know why. Maybe some part of me wanted to offer her some explanation as to why I became the way I was these couple of years. Maybe some part of me wanted forgiveness for being out of it for so long.

It was an enjoyable time spent with family. I didn't sneak off to smoke so many times like I used to when being around them. My uncle asked to borrow a lighter from me to start a fire to cook. I replied (with some sense of achievement) "I don't smoke anymore."

Making up for lost time.
User avatar
SoulFull
Junior Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:06 am
Likes Received: 38

#21

Postby cleanofgreen » Sun Jan 07, 2018 3:17 pm

Hey Soulfull,

Great to see it's getting easier around people again and the anxiety is lifting. I thought I was shy for over 2 decades :D now I start conversations with complete strangers on the street or in the shop and really enjoy the interactions. It's great to feel comfortable in your own skin again.

And I can tell you it only gets better form here :D
cleanofgreen
Full Member
 
Posts: 248
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 10:53 am
Likes Received: 162

#22

Postby SoulFull » Sat Jan 13, 2018 5:03 pm

Hey everyone, just dropping an update. Well, this is also going to be a long one. I'm going to dig up a bit of personal history towards the end, because I realize now what brought me back to excessive use of weed a few years back, after successfully quitting.

Thanks cleanofgreen you're certainly right. I have been less anxious and depressed recently. Suddenly I'm just different. For example I have been outside the house a lot and meeting people too. I remember I used to lock myself indoors not wanting to see anyone around the 1-2 month mark weed free. I wasn't motivated to do anything at all. All I wanted to do was read posts in this forum, trying to stay strong by drawing motivation from successful quitters like yourself, refusing to give up.

This forum helped me so much. The people here helped me so much. Whoever's reading this and know they're not going to reply, it's ok guys, I do this too. Not replying that is. :lol: It doesn't mean that I don't appreciate what you've wrote. I do. And I appreciate you reading my thread as well. To know that you've gained something here motivates me lots though. You guys are awesome, and I wish you well. Especially the ones who do drop a reply here :P

I'm now nearly 3.5 months off weed and 4.5 months off cigarettes. Not a single puff in months. I feel the urge to smoke cigarettes more than weed currently and that's not surprising since I hung out at my friend's home music studio last Saturday night, recording some music which they asked me to write the lyrics for a song a month back. They were smoking cigarettes like crazy in there. I was offered, not to say I wasn't tempted, but glad to say I declined easily. :D It feels good to have this recent strong will power. I'm now a non-smoker, and proud of it. It appears that I am also a rapper now. They recorded me rap my own lyrics last night and it felt great to be in such focused sobriety that I could actually pull it off! Who would've thought! I guess the universe is bringing back to me opportunities to unwrap all the untapped potential that was put on hold all these years due to marijuana's grip on me. By the way, music or the creation of music is really a good substitute to smoking.

I wanted to write a novel for so long (not in English), and I'm happy to say that I've started to go to the library bringing my laptop with me, and begin writing at 9.30am until 4.30pm with a short break in between last Friday. I hope this work ethic will continue until finally it gets done and someday I get it published. The thing is, why couldn't I do it when I was on weed? Wasn't I supposed to be creative due to its effect on my brain? The truth is I find it really hard to focus when I'm high. Like have tons of ideas but lack the ability to work on them. Another benefit of quitting I suppose; the ability to FOCUS and get things done.

So I mentioned earlier, I'm going to share a bit of history of how I became heavily addicted to weed. I'll start by telling you that I was a trained reflexologist, and I've been a therapist since 2011, loved doing it, before I stopped doing it full time and settled for a totally different job I didn't like, but gave me flexible working hours where I didn't have to stay in office the whole day (Or so I thought at that time). I figured I could perform therapy to customers part-time while maintaining this job I hated and receive income from 2 sources. But sadly the job I got into was toxic. I can't think of any other word except that; TOXIC. It was bad for me, but instead of searching for a better alternative, I got into a comfort zone and used weed to make me happy eventhough I was suffering inside. Not having to stay in office the whole time gave me so many oppurtunities to get stoned. After a while, I've become a hardcore addict. And then the years pass by so fast. I even stopped becoming a therapist, stopped taking orders to perform therapy on people and spent my time numbing the pain I had with weed. Besides, how could I perform therapy on people when customers can clearly see from my expression, that I was stoned out of my wits.

I no longer work in this TOXIC job. I quit last September. I didn't plan this, but not long after, I wanted to quit weed as well. So I did. I quit both weed and ciggarettes the same time. Relapsed on the weed one time and restarted over, making the duration for the cigarette clean longer than the weed clean by a month. Can you see this correlation between drugs and a toxic work environment? I certainly do.

For the 1st time in 3 years, I didn't decline a request from a customer calling me to perform some alternative treatment for her bedridden uncle in a hospital. He's been there for 5 months already, and their doctor advised them to seek out reflexology practitioners that could come to the hospital as an alternative treatment. So they called me. They got my number from a facebook page I left inactive for years.

Today, I went to work. Doing something I used to love doing. Helping others relieve their pain while getting paid to do it.

I just had to share all this here. So many things have turned positive for me after I made my decision to quit all these toxicities. Where was I all these years? What happened to this person?

I'm regaining back my lost self.
Getting stronger everyday.

Don't believe what I've said blindly. Experience this yourselves.

Peace.
User avatar
SoulFull
Junior Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:06 am
Likes Received: 38

#23

Postby InkChalk » Tue Jan 16, 2018 1:33 am

This thread is the main reason why i check on this site nowadays. You have a lot of insight in this journey that i find helpful and relatable.

I like the idea of going to the library for a full day and working on projects!
It's so true that going out and changing your surroundings is very productive and healthy. Smoking up makes you forget of all the simple places you can go. Change up the habits.

It's amazing what opportunities come up when you're clean, and all the new thing you can see.

Look forwards to your posts, it's helping others as much as it's helping you! Thanks!
InkChalk
Junior Member
 
Posts: 55
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:42 pm
Likes Received: 19

#24

Postby SoulFull » Tue Jan 16, 2018 5:39 pm

Hey InkChalk,
Thank you so much for your encouragement. I'm really happy that you find my journey beneficial. Have benefited from your posts too. :D I'm recording the ups and downs of this quit weed/cigarette journey so that I remember that the cons outweigh the pros whenever I'm tempted to ever smoke again. It seems to be working. I'm glad I started this thread.

I have read a lot of people's threads here old and new, and every one of them helped me in their own different ways, yours included.

It's like we're in an army together, combating the demons that have for so long isolated us and brought us down countless times before, preventing our own personal growth. I don't feel like I'm battling the demons alone when I'm here. Here, I gather intel from older platoons who've won their battles, learn their attack/defense strategies and customize to what works for me. I also study other platoons who are just beginning their fight like me. But I'm limited, that I can only share what I've experienced, and if this helps current and future platoons in their war against their own demons, then I'm glad I had done my part. However miniscule.

I'm just here yelling "Hey, you're not alone! I'm doing this! Heck, if I can, so can you!" over and over, and if I'm lucky, one day I can hear others yell back the same thing at me, like what you've just did.

I appreciate it a lot. Thanks InkChalk. All the best to you!
User avatar
SoulFull
Junior Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:06 am
Likes Received: 38

#25

Postby SoulFull » Fri Jan 19, 2018 5:48 am

       
I'm convinced that I was self medicating all these years by smoking. I have been going through serious anger outbursts recently. Maybe I smoked before to chill myself down whenever I get angry/irritated.  Now I need new ways to manage my anger. Toking is no longer the solution for me.
       
I went searching for related articles in this forum to help me control it. This was written by Leo Volont in the Anger Management thread category. Going to give this a try:

_________________________________

Anger Management Magic Trick

Also, I discovered a kind of Anger Management Magic Trick that still isn’t in much of the Literature. You’ll only find it here. First, some background – it seems that when humans are attacked or feel under serious threat, that even before the Threat or Danger becomes apparent to the Conscious Mind, that the core areas of the primitive brain begin to pump out Cortisol which is a powerful stimulant which energizes all the Fight and Flight and Rage responses. That Cortisol can be pumping for up to 3 seconds before the Conscious Mind has a chance to review whether there really is any Serious Threat – like the “wolf” we saw out of the corner of our eye was just the stupid village dog, or the “snake” in the path was just a long stick. Yes, the conscious mind can shut down the Cortisol if it catches it soon enough, but often if the cortisol is permitted to pump up too much before we decide we need to ‘Take Charge’, well, one of the things Cortisol does is Amps Up the Primitive Fighting Mental Programs and shuts down the Higher Rational Mind. That is why people feel they lose control over themselves, because they in fact DO lose control over themselves. As far as most of the Anger Management Literature is concerned, this is a real problem, that Cortisol is pumping and we have no way to know about it until it might already be too late. But HERE’s The TRICK. We CAN Know that the Cortisol is pumping before we experience any Conscious Emotions. You see, before we realize consciously that we are Angry we can sense the Very First Sign of Cortisol being released, which is THE TIGHTENING OF THE JAW MUSCLES OR THE CLENCHING OF THE TEETH. The very instant you feel your jaw muscles tense up, simple relax them and open your mouth. It seems that nobody can get all tensed up if they can breathe through an open mouth. I’ve been telling people on this Forum about this and people have found that it consistently works. You will not get angry if you catch that first Cortisol Reflex and relax it. It takes practice, but you are a gamer. Practice is what you do best, isn’t it? You are used to practice. I myself get a lot of practice with my cats. They do something bad and I feel my jaw muscles tense up, and so I instantly relax, and then I can go easy on the cats instead of chasing them around the house with a stick.

So, Aaron, let me know if any of this helps or if you have any questions or need clarification on anything.

Leo Volont



________________________________
   
User avatar
SoulFull
Junior Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:06 am
Likes Received: 38

#26

Postby SoulFull » Wed Jan 24, 2018 4:01 pm

Hey InkChalk, Cleanofgreen, VaxR, BasedNight, Miraculous;

The days have turned brighter
It was darkest before dawn
Now it's dawn
For a while it had been
And thank the heavens I didn't succumb
to the darkness
before dawn

I'll say this out loud
with truth and belief
for I have walked the darkest nights
but now with the sun
I rise at peace

For indeed, with hardship, will be ease
User avatar
SoulFull
Junior Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:06 am
Likes Received: 38

#27

Postby SoulFull » Tue Jan 30, 2018 6:49 am

Hey there Uncommon peeps,

4 Months Weed Clean
5 Months Cigarettes Clean

When I'm alone, I have no urges to smoke at all. I feel neutral. When I'm with friends or relatives, and if they start smoking, I kinda hate it now. I'd excuse myself immediately. I don't like it when I'm walking with my kids and then someone blows off their cigarette smoke in our direction. Even when I smoked before, I got up and went somewhere else when I see the smoke I was puffing out might bother other people especially kids. As for my weed buddies, I've stopped seeing them for quite some time now. They've stopped calling. Maybe they're starting to see things as they are now, that I've quit for good. Some of us go way back. So they probably know me well enough to understand the direction I'm heading towards. We're all in our 30s. I think most of us now understand that we would eventually have to face our demons some day. Maybe them seeing me, someone who was stoned 24/7, quit for good, would encourage them to quit as well. IF they see quitting to their benefit like I do, I mean.

Especially my younger brother who's in college right now. Just the other day, he got in an accident with his friend who was driving. They were stoned and managed to turn their rented van upside down after hitting a divider late at night. My heart collapsed when he called to tell me what happened, because we lost our healthy father in a car accident years ago, and it brought back painful memories. I was grateful that both he and his friend were not badly hurt. I'm the only one who knows about this in our family. It still pains me to keep the whole thing secret. My family could've lost my beloved brother and I'm the only one who knows about this. It really got to me that I shared a picture of a moment of him and me 5 years ago on facebook! They had to go do a police report regarding the accident, luckily another friend went to the police station to do it on their behalf, covering up for them I guess. Before that I prayed that he wouldn't be caught and tested for drugs, ruining his future. I hope my brother can one day quit smoking too. If anything were to happen to him, I'd definitely blame myself, as I'm sure he picked up the habit after seeing me brimming with happiness when I was using. I hope after the accident, he will come to his senses. I hope my quit goes well, and that one day he can see me feeling happier than ever, naturally. Without any substances. What better way to advise than to walk the talk.

I have a long way to go. Anxiety's still here. I freaked out the other day during my wife's family reunion at a rented old house in the country side. We were suppose to sleep over there over the weekend with her parents and her siblings but I felt so anxious that I just felt like leaving. I told her she can stay with the kids and that I needed to leave, but she refused and followed me with the kids and we drove back to the city. I was given the silent treatment for days. But yesterday we talked and she wasn't angry, only a bit sad. Sad that I wasn't strong enough yet to withstand even just a night's sleepover with her parents and siblings. I feel for her. But I couldn't help it at that time. I felt an overwhelming amount of negative energy there where I have no way of explaining. It could have been the house. She kinda understands, to my relief. She knows what her family thinks of me, and she can understand the negativity felt as she could feel it too. She wishes that her family knows me like she does. It's just that now, I've made her family hate me even more. Ofcourse they don't know that I'm going through withdrawal. I'm sure I have messed things up big time, but with all that stress, I still didn't want a single smoke, which is good, in a way.

This whole experience thought me that I have to allow myself more time to be fully functioning again, with better control of my anxieties and depression and whatever issues I have below the surface that was controlled by a large dose of Marlboros and MJs before. Also I've learned to not agreeing to do something that I'm not sure I can pull off just yet in an environment I'm not familiar with, with people I'm not sure I get along quite well. Maybe not yet. I'm allowing myself more time for my healing process, if this is the case. I'm taking small steps. As long as things get better, not worse. And I have to keep on taking the Omega supplements, as well as doing the workouts. I've neglected these two in pursuit of work and seeing how I was, I think I have to get back to my routine. Sweat and nutrition.

Boy that was a long one. Thanks for reading. If anyone would like to share their views, I would deeply appreciate it. Thanks in advance.

Cheers, SoulFull
User avatar
SoulFull
Junior Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:06 am
Likes Received: 38

#28

Postby SoulFull » Wed Feb 07, 2018 5:04 pm

I'm dedicating this post to Leo Volont who is very active in the anger management forum here in Uncommon. In my previous posts I've mentioned him and his helpful posts as I realized that I might have been self medicating with marijuana (or cigarettes) all these years to keep my anger issues at bay. Once I quit weed (or cigarettes), I find it harder to control my anger and and have been very frequently experiencing regrettable angry outbursts a few weeks back. I've read some people here in the addictions forum are also experiencing angry moments in their quit weed process. So maybe this'll be helpful. Type his name in the search panel if you're interested to know more. Here's what I think about Leo Volont and his work:


#5
Postby SoulFull » Wed Feb 07, 2018 4:44 pm

Dear Leo,

I just want to thank you for sharing this technique. I have been using it for some time and I can see the improvements in my ability to control my anger. For some reason it works and I guess I'm lucky to have come across your wonderful writings. I've read a lot of them since I find them informative, helpful, insightful and at the same time, entertaining. I respect that you take the time to respond to us angry people in order to help us overcome our weakness, which may have affected our lives severely before. I can feel your kindness and also your humor in some posts. I'm trying to emulate those two approaches to my life as well. I believe that you are trying to teach us to find the humor in life and not take ourselves too seriously all the time. I also believe that the kindness that you sincerely show is a testimony of how you yourself have overcome your own anger. Sorry if I got it wrong, that's just how I see things. I appreciate your replies a lot. They've helped me so much that I felt oblige to recommend your works to other forums in Uncommon.

I've been weeks without angry outbursts since I kept in mind the things you've said and practiced the jaw relaxing technique. It feels like such an accomplishment when I manage to keep the tiger in the cage instead of letting it impulsively pounce when I'm pushed to the edge. I have you and your cats to thank for this. Your cats have certainly done humankind a monumental service through your anger management practice sessions together. Please buy them some treats on my behalf. (I have cats too, and I find that I'm less angry at them now whenever they do things that usually pisses me off )

Anyway thank you my kind sir. Wishing you and your cats well. Please keep on writing.

Cheers,
SoulFull

User avatar
SoulFull
Junior Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:06 am
Likes Received: 38

#29

Postby SoulFull » Sun Feb 11, 2018 4:58 pm

4.5 months off weed
5.5 months off cigs
no meds, no alcohol, Coffee sometimes
Supplements: Omega3 fishoil, vitamin C+Zinc

Hey there everyone. Just dropping an update. Still clean and much has improved. I overcame my social anxiety which I experienced heavily during the early months of quitting by just getting out there and meeting as many people as possible. I've met and talked to more than 51 different people since 6th February. What an experience. So many stories exchanged. Really gives you tons of perspective. Knowing that countless people out there are living their lives as best as they can, really makes me feel like I want to continue this path as a non-user. Don't need to smoke anything ever. I that I am capable, and I don't need crutches. What an awesome week.

I've noticed that I'm allowed to post an avatar picture now. Cool. So I'm choosing a picture of me recording some songs I wrote at my friend's home studio. It is an empowering photo for me. I think I did mention here that I was asked by my friend and his group of musicians to write lyrics for the tunes they've recorded. I'm now their official lyricists and rapper. Currently we've recorded 5 songs, all written by me. If people say that they need weed to become creative, I'm a living proof that you don't. For the last 15 years or so, I've created nothing eventhough I felt that the ideas I had while on weed were superb. Suddenly when I quit 4.5 months back, I'm getting things done and now we got 5 songs. Will be working on more in the future. The point is, creativity doesn't necessarily have to come from any plant. And tons of good music can dispel whatever darkness lurking in our thoughts and mind.

Since I'm more emotionally stable now, I can drink coffee again. I quit coffee too at 1st because I was angry all the time when the effects of coffee faded out. But I can control my anger now. So coffee is like my gateway to euphoria. One night I drank one ice cold coffee while listening to Alan Walker's "Faded". Oh God that was awesome. Didn't feel like that for such a long time.

Anyway good luck everyone. Stay clean.
Peace and Love,
SoulFull
User avatar
SoulFull
Junior Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:06 am
Likes Received: 38


PreviousNext

  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to Addictions