Are You Normal?

Postby Denislh » Thu Jan 11, 2018 3:33 am

Most of us at times have asked ourselves “am I normal?

Who defines what is normal? Is being “normal” the best option?

A lot of what we call normal is handed down to us as we grow and interact with our environment. We develop beliefs, values, and attitude to life from the significant people in our life, our parents/caregivers, school, church, the media and our peers.

Gaining your beliefs, values, and attitude to life this way is probably fine as a child, providing you had reasonable, positive role models. However, as you become an adult, it might be wise to re-evaluate these to see how they are working for you now.

One way to look at “normal” as an adult would be to evaluate yourself and see how similar you are to most other people in your culture.

Another way to look at “normal” is a bell-curve. Being normal could be defined as being as being like 68% of the population. Does this mean you should you be like a sheep and just follow the crowd?

Being your own person requires you to move outside the 68% and develop your unique values, beliefs, and attitudes that are respectful of others. However, doing this could take courage and firm confidence in yourself. It requires you to have an internal value system that is not dependent on how others treat you, love you, or think about you.

What is normal is to accept that everyone is different and to love yourself for who you are. Embrace your uniqueness and respect the uniqueness of others.
Denislh
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#1

Postby ismailhh » Thu Jan 11, 2018 5:39 am

Every one who behaves the normal way is obviously normal while as a person who does opposite is abnormal. Personally i think a person who is able to practice legitimate thoughts is entitled for being a normal human being otherwise an abnormal if he or she doesn't practice them...
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