Weed is stealing my life and time

Postby Johnyg7 » Mon Aug 06, 2018 5:54 pm

Were do I begin, well firstly been smoking for +- 25 years am now 40 years old 10 years married to a lovely wife and too kids wife don't no I smoke I always use too cover up my tracks for I knew if I told her that I do smoke then she would just have too except my choice and that is that I don't want too tell her because I don't want her too think that of me and I think that is one of the reasons why I never use too continue to smoke for 3monts straight the thing is I stoped 9 month ago today being alcohol free i seem to smoke more now, well I decided again too stop hopefully for good that's why am starting this post too get inspiration too get my life back for good thank you for this furum it always helps me when I want too stop, I just read some post and I'm good but this time I want too stop for good sorry for spelling mistakes thank you.
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#1

Postby reckoning » Mon Aug 06, 2018 10:46 pm

Hey Johnyg7,

You've made a great start. Keep posting here. I had done multiply quits before this time, and this site and being part of this community is really taking me to new places and new levels of understanding about the work of the quit and the changes it can bring to lives.

Secrets have a way of eating away at us and making us feel ashamed but when you share here you can put that aside and get on with the work of the quit.

Keep reading the posts , you will get the drift that everyone has to find their own way on a very common journey we are all taking . For some of us it's a very big physical challenge and, for all of us I think I can say it does take mental rewiring , not to blow your life away or let it all go up in smoke.

Great that you are alcohol free, many of us find that quitting and not using alcohol either is a good combination, especially in the initial phase. Plus you can get right into working out how to manage your emotions without substances. I worked out that I was smoking a lot because of a way that I had about dealing with my life, problems and the way I thought about myself. So much of that has changed now, I am 8 months into this quit.

You have a community of quitters here who are always available. I know how much time smoking can take away from you. When you feel an urge to smoke, get on line and make a post, it's incredible how much that can keep you committed.

Keep going, keep reading and keep posting it's well worth doing.
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#2

Postby Johnyg7 » Tue Aug 07, 2018 1:33 pm

Thank you, reckoning for your reply will keep it all in mind wish me luck day 2 weed free let's do this
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#3

Postby Luisofu » Sun Aug 12, 2018 4:54 pm

Hi reckoning. im your age and quit 2 months ago. i ate it. strong stuff. my problem is the shortness of breath the anxiety and extreme fatigue. when can i expect a little change?
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#4

Postby Backatit » Sun Aug 12, 2018 8:10 pm

Hi Luis. It’s different for everyone. If you’re still having symptoms after 2 months you’re dealing with PAWS. Judging from the consensus here the bad news is you’ll be facing withdrawal symptoms anywhere from 8 months to 2 years+. The good news is that it progressively gets better, which is sometimes hard to notice because it is a slow process. Things that have worked for myself and others include:
- go easy on yourself. Allow yourself to celebrate your accomplishments instead of dwelling on the road ahead. 2 months is better than most addicts ever do
- Eat healthy. Eschew processed food, sugar and even meat and dairy in favor of balanced whole foods plant based alternatives
- Explore hobbies and interests
- Be social when you can, make new friends based on non using interests
- Consider 12 step meetings
- Exercise with weights, cardio, yoga whatever
- Begin a meditation practice
For me, I would try to add one small good habit every couple of months, but I would also go easy on myself if that habit didn’t stick, keeping the habit of not smoking weed the top priority.
I just passed 21 months off the herb and I’m hoping by New Years 2019 I’ll be symptom free. Every few months there’s a small notch up in the right direction.
Best of luck to you and congrats on the two months
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#5

Postby reckoning » Tue Aug 14, 2018 7:02 pm

Hey Luisofu

Keep going. I had the same kind of symptoms when I first quit too. It's all part of the territory from what I experienced. It will pass even though your mind will try and tell you otherwise. The anxiety and fatigue were big for me in the beginning.

Slowly I learnt how to give space to the anxiety and the fatigue and had to really take on how to self sooth myself without any substance to calm me down or energise me. For me the beginning part required a lot of pushing through and being kind to myself in the process and allowing this quit to be something that I was doing front and central in my life rather than trying to keep my old life going without any changes.

8 months down the track my life looks and feels nothing like the beginning. Ageing is hard enough but it really is so much better to be ageing without weed.

My concentration for one thing has reached new heights in the short term memory area. A few months ago I played numerous games of concentration with my 10 year old granddaughter. You know that game where you turn a deck of cards over and line them up and try and pick pairs. Well she smashed me and said "nana this game is good, I get to win and I think it is good for you, you really need to start remembering things more." Last week we had a few more rounds and boy was she surprised how well I did. I surprised myself as well, but I also knew inside that it was definitely evidence of my brain rewiring and giving me proof of that was rather good. We played several games so it was not just a fluke. Although I didn't win I got close! It was an amazing feeling. Ha there are many big and small benefits awaiting you.

Keep going, keep reading on this site and one thing that has made a massive difference for me, keeping this as uppermost priority in my life, is to keep posting. The posting here keeps my efforts front and central.
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#6

Postby Luisofu » Tue Aug 14, 2018 8:58 pm

How long before the anxiety, fatigue, insomnia and breathlessness begin to subside? and thx
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#7

Postby reckoning » Thu Aug 16, 2018 11:09 am

Mine is still subsiding now. It happens slowly over time and it depends on what you do. It's a long term process, hard to give it a figure. Mine is really only starting to settle a bit now after 8 months. Its worth it to keep going.
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#8

Postby Johnyg7 » Wed Sep 19, 2018 12:16 pm

Well still clean from the last time a posted nearly went to the dealer to buy some Jane but just looked at him and left the thing is they just legalized weed here in South Africa for personal use now I'm tempted to buy lame I know
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#9

Postby BullFrog » Wed Sep 19, 2018 2:51 pm

Hey John, do you have some group for marijuana addicts near by where you live? I imagine something like that could really help you in your struggle, give you encouragement, and help give you accountability.
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