CBD oil & addiction

Postby wakinglife » Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:43 pm

I’m now 12 years cannabis free. My job has been stressful lately, causing me to wake in the middle of the night and start thinking. It can take a while to ease back into sleep. A friend who works in the cannabis industry insists that CBD oil (no THC in it) will be a helpful supplement. As a recovered pothead I am a bit reluctant to try it, for fear of gradually sliding back into my old ways— ultimately ending up as a daily cannabis smoker.

I’m seeking input from any of you who have experience with using CBD as a sleep aid. Am I foolish to even consider it?

Ultimately, I know the decision is for me to make alone. However, I would value the advice of anyone who has used CBD oil after breaking an addiction to smoking cannabis.

Is it worth the risk of relapsing into my old habit?
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#1

Postby Richard@DecisionSkills » Sat Oct 13, 2018 2:40 am

wakinglife wrote:Is it worth the risk of relapsing into my old habit?


Sometimes an analogy can help with making a decision.

Imagine that a person was addicted to alcohol and now this person has been 12 years alcohol free. This person then has trouble sleeping due to some stress at work. A friend recommends a new type of “non-alcohol”. Would you recommend this person give it a try?

Personally, I would begin to explore other options. For instance, what makes it absolutely impossible to address the root cause(s), i.e. stress at work? Is it a money issue, an hours issue, a new boss? In 12 years, what skills have been gained, what new coping mechanisms and ways to deal with stress have been cultivated and why are these new mechanisms no longer working?

Shifting the Burden

The sneaky, slippery slope of trying a “quick fix” verses addressing the root cause is that this is how dependence on substances work, addictive or not. The CBD oil is a “shifting the burden” system where it is a solution that address the symptom, not the underlying cause. Over time a person must find new and more aggressive ways to address the symptom “not sleeping well” while failing to address the much more difficult problem of reducing stress at work.

Here is a link that better explains shifting the burden.

http://www.systems-thinking.org/theWay/ssb/sb.htm

The bottom line, I would avoid the CBD oil even if it doesn’ have THC. Instead, I would focus on figuring out points of leverage to address the root cause.
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#2

Postby ashthewarrior7 » Sat Oct 13, 2018 3:27 am

Fight the cause, not the symptom (stress)
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#3

Postby wakinglife » Sat Oct 13, 2018 5:27 am

Wise replies. It will be a tremendous amount of time and effort to reduce the stress at work. I suppose I was naively hoping there might be a “quick fix” that would help my sleep, leading to a virtuous cycle of being more rested which would then improve my workdays (and my patience level) and leave me feeling less stressed.

To be perfectly honest, one of the root causes of my current (slippery slope?) thinking is the fact that the Canadian media is filled with images, video, and info about cannabis becoming legal for recreational use next week (Oct 17). It has really caused me to drill down and look at some of the reasons I quit in the first place. It’s causing me to question my commitment to abstaining from cannabis.

Ultimately, only I can decide what’s right for me. One side of me thinks that ingesting CBD oil might bring more benefits to my life than drawbacks.

The slightly scarier part (to me) is that I am examining my alcohol consumption— getting a healthy buzz maybe once per month that causes a hangover the next day— and wondering if I have now reached a new stage in my life in which I can safely consume cannabis in moderation in lieu of alcohol to alter my perception and “party” socially.

I know this is going a bit off topic. I am just trying to express my inner thinking honestly and transparently, holding it up to the light to see it clearly.

This post would not suit my “Benefits...” thread, so I’m voicing it here. A part of me wonders if there is a stage that’s reached by long term quitters in which they become suggestible to relapse if the right conditions are presented (in my case, legal recreational cannabis nation wide).

Anyhow, I do appreciate the feedback. I think I’m wrestling with some big philosophical daemons here...

I would still be interested to hear anyone’s honest story (positive or negative) of using CBD oil after overcoming cannabis addiction.
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#4

Postby ashthewarrior7 » Sat Oct 13, 2018 3:11 pm

Waking life, you are an inspiration. Your contributions on this forum is priceless. But now you are in a phase of temptation, like you said, for a quick fix.

You WANT to hear the answer for us to say it's okay to consume cannabis but it's not going to happen because we are never going to tell you it's okay to look for support in something, that you yourself know, has screwed you over in the past.

The only true cure is taking that tremendous effort to tackle the root cause of your stress, no quick fixes or band aids are going to solve your problems.

If you want to boost your perception and social/party skills, work on improving via positive psychology/threapy/clubs etc. No substance use is going to truly improve you.

I'm sorry this post is harsh but it's what you have to read before you decide.
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#5

Postby wakinglife » Sat Oct 13, 2018 6:10 pm

Yes, ashthewarrior7, you're totally right!

There is a side of me that is actually really hesitant to post how I'm feeling, for fear of "triggering" (in the true sense) people who are in a different phase on the path of recovery. I have always been 100% honest on this forum-- that's the reason it's so valuable.

I'm going to tell you a story:

My wife is away at the moment. I'm home with my teenaged kids (they're fairly independent, so it's a bit like being at home alone once they're busy doing the things teens do). I have made the mistake of going down the media rabbit hole of "Oh, cannabis is going to be legal. It's going to be such a new world, where people can smoke freely without being judged." I must say, I am in favour of legalizing ALL drugs. Yep. You heard right. I think all drugs should be legal, regulated, and addiction should be treated as a medical/psychological issue rather than a criminal issue. So. Here I stand on the edge of my country, looking towards what next Wednesday is going to bring.

I smoked cannabis from age 12 to 33. I tried to reduce, moderate, abstain for TEN YEARS before I quit successfully with the help of this forum. Honestly, Uncommon Knowledge Forum was the ONE key difference between a decade of failed attempts at quitting and where I am today (over a decade weed free).

Back to my story (it's a shameful one).

So, I'm sitting on the couch, watching the news, scrolling through Facebook, basically looking to be entertained or stimulated in some way. That's when my cravings were triggered in a way that they probably have not been in many years. A CTV news story talked about how local dispensaries are clearing out their inventory in preparation of next week's "sell only government-approved product" at dispensaries or face fines or getting shut down. They had a news crew in a local cannabis dispensary (1 km from my house), showing all of the varieties (close-up shots of really prime product). I saw that they had CBD oil in what looked like really professional packaging.

I was watching this, hearing about how all this sh*t is on sale a short distance from my home, and a voice in my head was like, "Eff it. What have you got to lose. Go buy some of this new miracle oil, and see if it helps with your sleep and your 45-year-old aches and pains."

I am not proud to admit that I told the kids I was going for a quick walk, and I hopped in the car (walking would have been too slow-- I likely would have lost my nerve). I drove to a parking spot a short block away from the shop. My heart was racing. Is this what an addict feels like on the brink of relapse? (It was a mix of excitement coupled with "What the f*** are you doing?!?").

As I approached the shop I could see people behind the counter. It looked like they were packing away display cases and cashing out for the night. Yep. Another guy approached the door at the same time as me. He asked, "They still open?" We both looked at the door. They had closed at 8 pm. It was 8:03.

Relieved, I caught my breath and walked back to my car. I decided instead of buying CBD oil like an idiot I should probably go get some groceries (since I already had the car). It felt good to get groceries. I bought whatever the hell I wanted, even treating myself to a few items (healthy, but luxurious) that my wife would likely not have purchased if she'd been the one buying groceries.

I needed to write this. I needed to get this off my chest. Oh yeah. I can't remember if I said I'm doing "Sober October" (no booze so far this month; not really that big a deal). There's a part of me that can see the perfect storm of craving triggers that arose:
-legal weed media hype
-imagery of weed near my house (seeing "beautiful" bud has ALWAYS been a trigger for me, to this day)
-knowing this legal product was ON SALE
-my wife's out of town
-lack of solid sleep for several weeks (since start of school year in September-- I'm a high school teacher)
-hanging out with my cannabis-industry friend the night previous
-no altered state (booze free for a few weeks), so craving release
These things, in conjunction, caused a guy who has 12 FREAKIN' YEARS off the stuff to consider buying.

Go figure.

I am so glad to have this space to tell my tale. It is my sincere hope that by sharing this I will help others (as well as helping myself). I want to be honest about where I'm at, so other long term quitters don't get blindsided if they happen to enter a similar set of circumstances (yes, it's unlikely-- but possible).

Thank you for being my wise sounding board.

I am feeling strong today. I just did my workout. I am super glad I woke up clear-headed, substance-free, and ready to take on the world.

You people are lifesavers!

WL

(NOTE: not re-reading this post to edit -- excuse any typos-- so I don't chicken out and censor it.)
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#6

Postby BullFrog » Sun Oct 14, 2018 3:27 pm

Wakinglife...wow, I admire your honesty. You just open your soul and I think that is amazing. And I am SO glad that shopped had closed when you arrived. Now you are the stronger for it! (and by the way, I am definitely against the drug war as well as I think it is immoral and drug abuse is a medical issue and not a criminal one).

I almost see the work of God in your story (if you don't believe in God then I imagine you won't find that comment very enlightening) as you were spared the potential relapse and who knows how long of fighting against it from henceforth!

You are awesome, wakinglife, and my heart is lifted up this morning to have read your "success" the other day. Keep strong my friend, love sobriety, and be the man you and your family always want you to be.

Fight on!
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#7

Postby Bagobones » Mon Oct 15, 2018 3:28 am

wakinglife wrote:Wise replies. It will be a tremendous amount of time and effort to reduce the stress at work. I suppose I was naively hoping there might be a “quick fix” that would help my sleep, leading to a virtuous cycle of being more rested which would then improve my workdays (and my patience level) and leave me feeling less stressed.


I 100% agree with the ash and Richard.. Take the long difficult and more rewarding route of going after the cause.

wakinglife wrote:To be perfectly honest, one of the root causes of my current (slippery slope?) thinking is the fact that the Canadian media is filled with images, video, and info about cannabis becoming legal for recreational use next week (Oct 17). It has really caused me to drill down and look at some of the reasons I quit in the first place. It’s causing me to question my commitment to abstaining from cannabis.


It seems you have to go back to page one of your legendary thread here and read it one more time, with all the answers other users posted too. Only you know whats best for you. I think you will find some answers for your dilemma there...

wakinglife wrote:Ultimately, only I can decide what’s right for me. One side of me thinks that ingesting CBD oil might bring more benefits to my life than drawbacks.

The slightly scarier part (to me) is that I am examining my alcohol consumption— getting a healthy buzz maybe once per month that causes a hangover the next day— and wondering if I have now reached a new stage in my life in which I can safely consume cannabis in moderation in lieu of alcohol to alter my perception and “party” socially.


One of my personal friends that motivated me to quit, stayed abstinent for 7 years... It took her 1 month to get back to her old ways. She has been quitting her out of control weed smoking every monday now, for 2 year. hehe.. Once again, its up to you. Personaly I think you will find your way back to the old habbits faster than you think..

For me, and my friend, weed was the big love and problem.. Not alcohol, not cocain, not opium, but weed.. I still miss it, because it was the drug I loved. If thats the case for you too, you will not have the same control over weed as you have on alcohol..

wakinglife wrote:I would still be interested to hear anyone’s honest story (positive or negative) of using CBD oil after overcoming cannabis addiction.


I have personaly given my good friend the CBD oil Charlottes Web. She got strong migrene, that leades to not sleeping. She is a superstreight non smoker. It was absolutely one of the best gifts she has ever gotten, and beat ANYTHING the doctors have given her for the last 20 years.. But because of my background and knowlege I will not take it myself, before I have more proof...

For what your saying about the TV, remember the north american marketing machinery is working overtime on this, and the stockmarked is going wild over this.. I have my positions in Aurora and a couple of the usual suspects, and its been a very nice ride since the summer of 2017. Its also an enourmes amount of money to be had in this, and the wolfs are out running.

For the medicine aspect of weed, remember we are in the infancy of it. I really believe in it, I just dont believe too much of the north american way of doing it these days.. Its a bunch of stoners in dispensiries pretending to be pharmasists.. Its not cool in any way, believe me, I was one of them in one of the first dispensaries in the bay area... Have a look at this TED talk, and look to the israelis (med weed researsh, not war and politics), for serious unbiased med weed information...

med weed:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ioJbVyNg08

marketing and delutions in the ongoing north american weed hysteria:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmqtPaMMVuY
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#8

Postby erica2018 » Tue Oct 16, 2018 6:07 pm

Hi wakinglife, I have read your posts in the past and you are very inspirational. My advice is don’t do it! I agree with many of the other responses, don’t look for a quick fix. I have not tried CBD oil, but I understand that it’s not supposed to be addictive, but in my opinion, anything that makes you feel good can be addictive!. As a long time smoker(now ex-smoker) and fellow Canadian(from Montreal) I too have been bombarded with recent cannabis ads – but the legalization of weed was the catalyst that led to my quitting. I have quit before, (several times)and relapsed, and I recognize that I have an addictive personality/strong penchant for weed. When weed was illegal/hard to get, it forced me to smoke “in moderation” because I had no choice, (but it was better that way) I know that easy access means that I could easily be high 24/7 and broke as sh***! So I had to quit completely . The ads don’t tempt me, and my new addiction is exercise and being healthy and fit. Exercise releases stress, gives you a natural high, helps you sleep and gives you a buff bod too! Know yourself, and know your weaknesses and stay away from them. If you have an addictive personality, you could be heading down a slippery slope. Good luck, whatever your decision.
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#9

Postby BullFrog » Wed Oct 17, 2018 12:17 am

Hey Erica! Noticed this was your first post! Glad to have you here and thanks for adding to wakinglife's thread. We would also love to hear about your story. Please consider starting a thread so we can hear it!

Fight on!
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