Cognitive Impairments

Postby Icebags210 » Sat Jun 20, 2020 11:18 am

After 10 months of abstaining from weed, cognitive impairment is my biggest issue. My wit has not returned to me. I find it difficult to joke around with my co-workers, or resolve conflicts with customers at work. I know I used to be much more funny and charming, but that part of my personality has remained lost to me. I feel like my mind is blank a lot of the time. Normally throughout the day I'd be entertaining thoughts about interests of mine, plans I'd like to make, or just something a friend said that made me smile, but this past year I feel so foggy most of the time. I'll go about most of my days with very little running through my mind.

My thought processes has been severely dulled, and I find myself stumbling through conversions with people. I just have so much trouble forming and maintaining thoughts. I also struggle to visualize things in my mind's eye. I often can't get a clear picture of what I'm thinking of in my head, and when I can the image is fleeting. I'm a lot less irritable than at the one month mark, and for the most part my mood hasn't been gloomy the past couple of months, but I'm not seeing steady improvements to my cognitive functioning. I know the healing process can take a long time, but it's really disheartening to not see your old self emerge after nearly a year.
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#1

Postby Nemochaken » Sat Jun 20, 2020 11:48 pm

Basically the same.. Brain fog, lost of sense of humour... Can someone comment on that?
I was always funny, charismatic person, now i can hardly speak.. Will it improve over time?
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#2

Postby tokeless » Sun Jun 21, 2020 9:07 am

Perhaps weed made you both more relaxed around people, which enabled you to make humour more easily. I've met people who thought they were hugely entertaining when high on cocaine but they weren't really. They were just high and full of themselves... they complained of lack of confidence when they didn't use.
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#3

Postby biggiesize » Fri Jun 26, 2020 12:48 pm

when I successfully quit 12 years ago,it took me a year to feel somewhat normal and about a year and a half before My brain felt completely recvovered.I had headaches,blurred vision,and felt like parts of my brain were dead for the longest time but i returned to normal and have had no more issues.
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#4

Postby tokes » Sun Jun 28, 2020 12:27 am

2 years and 4 months in and my extremely quick wit has just recently began to rear it's head but only slightly.

Nothing of how I previously was with being able to leave a room in laughter and respond to quick banter. Real shame really. I don't know your backstory but I started smoking at 16 and continued on for almost 8 years daily.

It's without a doubt I've effected the development of my brain and haven't been able to upgrade my wit and humour in compliance with a changing adult world.

I've tried to find studies based on whether long term effects are reversible and that hasn't been a long enough study to figure that out yet. But some studies suggest the brain can repair previous damage made. In layman's terms the our receptors have dulled, resulting in slower response times of information being passed along the synapses. By the time I've thought of a good enough come back in office banter it's already too late to say it, so staying quiet or saying something generic and superficial is usually how such a convo goes down.

I'm just generally more serious than I was. Has it been due to life experiences along the way, the anxiety and panic attacks which has just put a rain cloud over my head or is it actual damage from cannabis due to smoking before the age of 21. Probably both. But whatever the case just recently I've felt a difference in the way my brain responds to jokes, banter and quick comebacks...i feel quicker and my responses are smarter.

I can't say anything that has specifically helped me to that point so there's not much I can say it that area. All the general stuff really, gym, eating well, cutting alcohol, cigarettes and all the rest of it.

Ill be keeping my thread updated and I will make sure to mention any updates or progress in that area.
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#5

Postby tokeless » Sun Jun 28, 2020 5:30 am

Why do you feel it's important to have quick banter and humour when with others? Does it matter and if so what is saying about you if you can't get back your razor sharp wit?
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#6

Postby Candid » Sun Jun 28, 2020 6:55 am

Most of us live around 80 years now, and what we do to our bodies and brains has a cumulative impact. I've been a smoker (cigarettes) for the better part of five decades, I've taken in loads of drugs legal and otherwise, and five years ago I suffered a brain injury. How can you expect these things not to take their toll?

In lockdown I got the habit of being at my desk all day, smoking and boozing like there's no tomorrow and taking ever-larger doses of a prescribed drug in order to get a few hours' sleep. I interrupt this only by going to the kitchen for something to eat or outside for a smoke. That's my exercise. I'm struggling to get into my clothes.

Some things are reversible and some aren't. I expect to lose some weight when (if?) life gets back to normal. I get scared when I realise I'm forgetting words and names I once knew well. I've long had the idea that I'll be able to 'speak' in writing long after other faculties have shut down.

There's no point complaining about the effects of the things we've done to ourselves. All of our long-term habits eventually take their toll. I've been to more funerals than I can count in the past few years, made lots of nursing-home visits and seen all the horrifying effects of dementia.

The deal is, you get a body with a brain in it so you can have the adventures of your choice. As you would be aware, some people start out with compromised brains, bodies, or both. Medical advances mean they stay alive with those conditions.

tokes wrote:I've tried to find studies based on whether long term effects are reversible and that hasn't been a long enough study to figure that out yet. But some studies suggest the brain can repair previous damage made. In layman's terms the our receptors have dulled, resulting in slower response times of information being passed along the synapses.


I'd take the road of optimism if I were you. There are always stories of people who defy the medical prognosis. There are also people who think their way into premature old age. If you don't believe you can get well, you probably won't. This is why I invariably have a pop at people who come here listing their symptoms and counting the days since they last used their drug of choice. Look for what's going right. Order your mind to get well and stay well.

Icebags210 wrote:My thought processes has been severely dulled, and I find myself stumbling through conversions with people. I just have so much trouble forming and maintaining thoughts. I also struggle to visualize things in my mind's eye.


Whether you realise it or not, these are all affirmations. They're instructions to your brain. If that isn't what you want, start telling a different story. Look for what's going right instead of what's going wrong.

I know that all seems like hippy-dippy new-age bs, but take the grain of truth in it. Do the experiment and prove it to yourself.
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#7

Postby Icebags210 » Tue Jul 07, 2020 5:49 am

Hey Biggiesize

Actually stumbled across your posts a couple days after I posted. Appreciate the response buddy. I’m hopeful I’ll feel completely normal within a year or so. I’m coming up on a year now, and I’ve definitely been seeing improvements with my mood and physical fatigue the last couple of months. Just waiting on my mind to catch up.

Tokes sorry your recovery has dragged on so long. Seems like you’ve been coping well though. Hope you continue to see your wit return and yes please keep us posted if you can.
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