OCD medical recomendations

Postby ordeP » Fri Apr 23, 2021 2:16 pm

Greetings, first time posting in here, so excuse some of my ignorance. Also not native english speaker so forgive any grammatical mistakes I might make. My long-distance girlfriend has ocd. She lives in Indonesia and has gone to a psychiatrist there but feels insecure about his opinion on the medication to take, so I though about asking it here. Is this a proper place to ask this kind of question?
The medication she was given was:

Rispiridone
Clobazam
Sertraline

To describe her ocd, she usually gets stuck in weird positions to look at a spot (on the floor, wall, etc), has problems wipping after bathroom sometimes (though lately it has stopped). Also, on some rare occasions, has some big panic attacks which cause her to scream, maybe even hit herself, and insult everything and everyone in the vicinity. This used to be worse from what she told me, but it still has some serious problems nowadays.

She is afraid to take the medication I mencioned since it might have serious repercursions on her, so I would like to know your opinions on it. Thanks in advance!
ordeP
New Member
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2021 1:43 pm
Likes Received: 0


#1

Postby desperate788 » Fri Apr 23, 2021 3:30 pm

ocd is said to be a treatment resistant disease i suffer from that too i see a therapist
User avatar
desperate788
Super Member
 
Posts: 40971
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 3:39 pm
Likes Received: 107

#2

Postby Richard@DecisionSkills » Fri Apr 23, 2021 3:36 pm

ordeP wrote: Is this a proper place to ask this kind of question?


Unfortunately, no.

This is an anonymous forum. You are asking for medical advice about a complex set of conditions and prescriptions for another person. And even if a forum member was to give you advice you have no idea if that advice is any good.

For instance, I could tell you that instead of Clobazam she might want to try Zoloft. Now who the hell am I to make that kind of recommendation? I don't know your girlfriend, I have never talked with your girlfriend, and your girlfriend is not my patient. Would it be responsible or even ethical for me or anyone else to give this sort of blind advice? ABSOLUTELY NOT!

But let's say you can verify that I'm not just some random online stranger. Let's assume you can confirm that I'm a world expert on how to treat OCD. Would that make it okay for me to weigh in on the treatment plan of your long distance girlfriend? NO!!!!

I'm no fan of the medical community. At the same time I'm even less of a fan of seeking medical advice about combinations of prescription medications for another person from strangers on a forum.
Richard@DecisionSkills
MVP
MVP
 
Posts: 11335
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 2:25 am
Likes Received: 1185

#3

Postby desperate788 » Fri Apr 23, 2021 3:53 pm

what about supplements Richard? Do you think its unethical to recommend them? My personel experience revealed that they dont work except rare cases.
User avatar
desperate788
Super Member
 
Posts: 40971
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 3:39 pm
Likes Received: 107

#4

Postby Richard@DecisionSkills » Fri Apr 23, 2021 4:22 pm

desperate788 wrote:what about supplements Richard? Do you think its unethical to recommend them? My personel experience revealed that they dont work except rare cases.


Scroll back through your repetitive 40,000+ posts desperate. Follow the advice you have repeatedly ignored for 10+ years.
Richard@DecisionSkills
MVP
MVP
 
Posts: 11335
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 2:25 am
Likes Received: 1185

#5

Postby ordeP » Sat Apr 24, 2021 11:15 am

Richard@DecisionSkills wrote:
ordeP wrote: Is this a proper place to ask this kind of question?


Unfortunately, no.

This is an anonymous forum. You are asking for medical advice about a complex set of conditions and prescriptions for another person. And even if a forum member was to give you advice you have no idea if that advice is any good.

For instance, I could tell you that instead of Clobazam she might want to try Zoloft. Now who the hell am I to make that kind of recommendation? I don't know your girlfriend, I have never talked with your girlfriend, and your girlfriend is not my patient. Would it be responsible or even ethical for me or anyone else to give this sort of blind advice? ABSOLUTELY NOT!

But let's say you can verify that I'm not just some random online stranger. Let's assume you can confirm that I'm a world expert on how to treat OCD. Would that make it okay for me to weigh in on the treatment plan of your long distance girlfriend? NO!!!!

I'm no fan of the medical community. At the same time I'm even less of a fan of seeking medical advice about combinations of prescription medications for another person from strangers on a forum.


I'm not saying I will follow blind advice, but at the very least hear an opinion from in here since she refuses to visit another one in Indonesia. I would like to at least receive an opinion on the medication itself. It's ok if I don't get help from here but I would like to at least try to find a solution.

Thanks for the your response though!
ordeP
New Member
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2021 1:43 pm
Likes Received: 0

#6

Postby Richard@DecisionSkills » Sat Apr 24, 2021 1:49 pm

ordeP wrote: I would like to at least try to find a solution.


I can empathize with wanting to find a solution. You care about this person.

One of the toughest lessons in life is learning to recognize and accept our role in a given situation and in a given relationship. This role, whatever it might be, limits the solutions we can or should offer. In this case your role is limited to "long distance boyfriend".

Imagine a loved one calls, stranded on the road. Their car is broken down, and they describe a banging, clicking sound, and say that the interior smells of gas. They called a mechanic and that mechanic is trying to make repairs, but your loved one is still stranded. She is not happy and says the mechanic is using a ratchet set, flat head screw driver, and a hammer.

What are your solutions?

You are not a mechanic. You are also not talking with the mechanic. All you get is information 2nd hand from your non-mechanic loved one, describing the symptoms of the car and the tools they see the mechanic using.

So you go into an anonymous forum and post, "My loved one is stranded. Here is the story, here are the symptoms of the broken down car, and here are the tools the mechanic is using. Any advice?"

The advice is to stop trying to fix the car. That is not your role.

Your role is "boyfriend" not mechanic. The role of the boyfriend is to be there to listen, to talk, and to offer encouragement. That is your only real solution.

Or maybe, maybe you offer the solution that she call a new mechanic, but that is also difficult. She might not want to call another mechanic. And even if she does start over with another mechanic you have no idea how close the previous mechanic was to repairing the car. You have no idea if a new mechanic will be better than the current mechanic, or if the combination of mechanics has just made the situation worse.
Richard@DecisionSkills
MVP
MVP
 
Posts: 11335
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 2:25 am
Likes Received: 1185



  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to Psychology