Benefits of being off weed

#2535

Postby jage » Sun Jun 24, 2018 7:29 am

Congrats WL! Wishing I had stayed the course as I was one year behind you when I found this forum. Can’t believe that was 11 years ago. Facebook was some college kids’ idea still stewing but this forum was my support and my outlet. I’m impressed that you are still here and I find that inspiring in and of itself! I guess one thing to be happy about is that this quit has been fairly easy in comparison. I mistakenly thought I could manage occasional use for a couple of years after being off a full 5 but I was so wrong. One is too many and 100 is not enough... I had a dream the other night that my one hitter was full of maggots. That’s enough to keep me clean for sure! I’m going to have to hold on to that and keep reading this forum. Approaching my 3rd month now. Hoping to find my energy again soon. Thanks for checking in!
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#2536

Postby Cali-Detroit » Sun Jun 24, 2018 4:34 pm

Hehe, thanks Rik! I'll keep my eyes to the sky in anticipation :)
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#2537

Postby echoes123 » Mon Jun 25, 2018 12:01 am

It has been very helpful for me to read all the benefits out here. Last few days have been very difficult for me. Here is a timeline.. I am 37 now, I started smoking when I was ~24-25, mostly while drinking with friends, once a week or so, slowly it became a habit but never exceeded 6 to 10 cigs a day. I would smoke pot when available which was not very often. Then about 4 years ago I had more frequent access and at 34 I started smoking pot almost daily. I decided I had quit, it was taking too much time and I was not enjoying all the addictions anymore. So I quit both cigarettes and pot 2 months back. first 2 weeks were very bad mostly due to nicotine withdrawal, I think. Then I went back to pot for a 10 day period to clam the nerves. Now I have been off cigarettes for 2 months and off pot for 1 month, things seemed good. However, it started getting very difficult last week. I had a few set backs at my work. I have been working on my gig for a year and now I am back on the job market. The stress, anxiety about the future, and overwhelming depression is all just killing me. I have been going to the gym and it helps for a few hours. But the depression is in my voice and I am unable to concentrate on work or job search. The benefits in this thread are great but it seems the depression and anxiety can last months even years.... this is very difficult while I look for a job... too many thoughts, scary scenarios, etc. I know every person is different but any help of advise on how to deal with this will help... how long is this likely to last? What should I do differently?
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#2538

Postby Cali-Detroit » Mon Jun 25, 2018 12:47 am

Hey Echoes, welcome.
A couple of things stand out right of the bat to me. One, you started smoking weed very late in life, and two, it's only been four or so years. Which of course is still enough time to develop a problem, but the fact that your brain had long since finished developing and also that the time frame was really pretty short bodes very well for you.

I could see how reading about other experiences here might cause some concern, but realize most of us started as teenagers (18 here) long before our brains had fully finished developing. We also smoked very heavily (5-10 times per day for myself) and did it for YEARS, if not decades. For that situation, there is going to be serious recover y time involved, I'm talking years. And every stage will be miserable in it's own way.

This isn't to minimize or discount your experience, just to encourage you that you may very well recover much quicker than you think or expect. You're really in a better position than most here. Regardless of ones level of experience, time is the universal factor, based on my personal experience and the anecdotal evidence I've gleaned from the very good folks here. Professional mental health counseling can be very beneficial as well.

Many times whatever leads us to abuse drugs, and I include alcohol in this category, is something deeper within ourselves than hasn't been addressed. Also, keep in mind, with a completely sober mind, seeing the world as it is can be a difficult revelation to deal with. I'm not a cynic or a pessimist by any means, but a realist, and the reality is that some truly dreadful and horrible things are perpetrated upon weaker and more vulnerable human beings on a very, very regular basis. It's happening within a 5 mile radius of where you stand at this very moment, and there's really nothing you or I or anyone else can do about that. It's enough to make a person "just say no" to sobriety for the rest of their natural lives, and I think this is one of the hardest things for people trying to stay clean. It's also one of the least talked about and it's really no secret why. But that's reality, these are our people, and there are some beautiful souls out there no doubt, but there are monsters and demons that walk among us each and every day. I'm not religious one bit, this is just what it is.

Whew! Sorry for that rant, but it had to be said. I'm obviously still working through my own shyte.

Try and focus on some benefits you've experienced, even if it's just one or two.
List them here and let time do it's things.
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#2539

Postby wakinglife » Sun Jul 22, 2018 5:10 pm

12 Years Cannabis Free - A recovery story

My story of involvement with weed is pretty typical: I tried smoking hash as an adolescent while at a party with my friend. His older sister was hosting a bash. Her friends were drinking and doing “hot knives” in the kitchen. I had consumed a couple of drinks, and in my highly-suggestible state decided I’d like to partake of this strange ritual. The de facto stoner leader of the group was a burly, confident guy. He said he’d start me off with some starter-sized “nerds”. The process of “hot knifing” hashish involves heating two regular knives in the element of a stove. One knife is then pressed onto a “nerd” (small, mouse-turd sized ball of hash) to pick it up. The smoker leans over the stove as the person doling out the hot knives sandwiches the hash ball between the two heated blades. A deep inhalation, the nerd is efficiently consumed, and every particle of smoke is absorbed by the eagerly awaiting lungs.

I had about five or six hot-knived hash tokes. I finally started to feel something. The hash smoke seemed to compound the effects of the alcohol I’d previously consumed. I told one of the partygoers that I was feeling dizzy and weird. The girl happened to be empathetic and asked me how much I’d had to drink. That’s when I told her I’d had some drinks, and smoked some hash. She looked concerned. “You’re telling me you mixed booze and weed?”

Judging by the look on her face, this was cause for alarm. “Uhh . . . yeah. I just tried weed for the first time.”

“You’ve never smoked weed before? And you decided to smoke it for the first time after you’ve been drinking?”

“Yeah. Is that bad?”

“Yes, it’s bad. You’re not supposed to mix drugs and alcohol.”

“Oh. I didn’t know that.”

“Yeah. It’s not a good idea. It can make you really sick. You could even die from it.”

Woah. My head was spinning. Here I was, twelve years old, at a party of 16 year olds who seemed like full grown adults. I was out of my depth. Swept up in the good times, I’d decided to take a chance with my life, mixing weed and alcohol.

For the next couple of hours I alternated between putting my face in the freezer, lying down on the rumpus room shag carpet, and telling anybody who would listen, “I mixed weed and alcohol!”

I was a complete dumbass. There was no real euphoria, just confusion, dizziness, and general anxiety that I had caused irreparable harm to my brain. It was a full year before I had the nerve to try weed again.

Fast forward 21 years. Age 33, I’d been trying, unsuccessfully to reduce my cannabis intake for the previous ten years. I’d smoked recreationally through my teenage years. There had been stretches in my young adult life that I had gone without for months at a time (when I spent three months in India, for example). However, I had become a daily cannabis smoker. To take a day off was an accomplishment. I’d make promises to myself that I’d get it down to “just on weekends,” or “special occasions,” or “I just won’t buy it myself,” or “I’ll only smoke with other people, never alone.” These turned out to just be the rationalizations of an addicted mind. Science has shown that roughly 9% of people who use cannabis become addicted. I was clearly part of this 9%. Weed might be non-addictive for over 90% of people, but I was in that elusive group that enjoyed it just a bit too much.

Weed seemed to calm me down, put me in touch with dreamy altered states, make food, music, and sex better. For every mind-altering substance there are clear benefits and drawbacks. Weed offered some compelling benefits. The downsides were fairly low key: isolating myself when stoned, feeling groggy upon first waking up in the morning, getting sinus and lung congestion from time to time, having red eyes and a raw throat if I’d smoked too much. In truth, I didn’t think about the downsides all that much. Mainly, I just wanted to regain control of my actions. It alarmed me that I would lie to myself about how much weed I smoked. It felt like there was a subtle split in my psyche: the healthy, wants-what’s-best side of me contrasting with the hedonistic, just-enjoy-life side. I wanted to strike a balance between the two. I know that moderation is good for most things. Unfortunately, I was not capable of moderation when it came to cannabis. I’d kept journals of my quit attempts. The pattern seemed to follow a curve: abstaining for a length of time, then using once a week, then multiple times per week, finally back to daily use. I would not have believed it unless I’d witnessed it with my own eyes. These journals were written by me for my benefit. It took a full decade to realize the madness of my own actions. My intentions were not in alignment with my deeds.

Quitting successfully. In July of 2006 I signed up for a day long workshop with a wise woman in my area. She was a practitioner of shamanism (her primary tool: using drumming to induce a trance state to “journey” to realms of altered perception). One of the requirements for the workshop was to abstain from drugs and alcohol for 24 hours before and after. The teacher said that these substances can affect the learning process, the journey, and the integration of the wisdom gained. I figured it was worth committing fully, as the workshop was $150 for the day. The last joint I smoked was on Friday, July 21st. A friend (coincidentally, I was the one who had first introduced him to pot) came over to play chess. The joint we smoked together actually blurred our conversation and turned the night hazier and less connected.

The shamanic journeying workshop was on Sunday, July 23rd. I arrived clear-headed, after following the 24 hour drug and alcohol free rule. There was a portion in the day where we had to truly ask ourselves if there was anything in our lives that was holding us back. I meditated on the question. There was nothing obvious. Then, it dawned on me. My habitual cannabis use was holding me back.

I have never before written the personal visions that occured on my shamanic journey that day. Depending on your frame of reference, you might fully comprehend the power of such visions, or you can dismiss them as mere fantastical imagining. Regardless, this particular vision proved to be the starting point of a path to recovery from cannabis addiction.

The question I asked myself before going into the trance state: “How can I be whole without cannabis?”

Following my instructor’s guidance I slipped into a trance state (lying comfortably as she drummed consistently). I entered the lower world. I recognized the landscape as the mountain behind my parents’ home in the Okanagan Valley. There were wild rabbits nervously chewing on short grasses. A mountain lion (cougar) looked down, silently, powerfully, from a rocky ledge. The rabbits continued to chew nervously. They were doing what they needed to do, chewing on grasses, trying to stay calm, but their hearts were racing. I became one of the rabbits. This grass was good. I could look around. I knew there were things out there that could hurt me, so I was in a state of heightened nervousness. I could not be fully present to enjoy the beauty of my surroundings. I knew only that I needed this grass to survive, even though it put me at risk to be out in the open, eating it.

The cougar did not hesitate when the time came to attack. It leapt down off of the ledge, soaring fiercely, without pause. It literally shredded every rabbit in the glade. Consumed them. Tore them to pieces with its fearsome claws and teeth. It ate every one of them.

I was no longer a rabbit. I was myself. The cougar was tearing me apart. Ripping me limb from limb, consuming my flesh and bone as the life flowed from my body.

The cougar consumed me.

I was devoured.

I became the cougar.

The intensity of this vision lives on in my cells. Energy is surging through me as I type these words. This vision, although highly personal, is an allegory for life as a cannabis addict.

Unleash your inner cougar.

Twelve years cannabis free today, and going strong.
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#2540

Postby Cali-Detroit » Sun Jul 22, 2018 5:21 pm

Wow, great story. At 3.5 months, I feel so far from powerful and cougar-esque. I want to. I keep hoping it's just something time will heal.

I've been near the edge lately, and remembering why I become consumed by the drug: it lead me away from that edge, many times. The stakes are much higher now though. It's not just me anymore.

Being devoured sounds quite appealing
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#2541

Postby SoulFull » Tue Jul 24, 2018 11:08 pm

Thanks Wakinglife for sharing that.. and congrats for staying quit for more than a decade. It's been a long time since I posted anything, been a bit busy I guess but glad to say I'm still cannabis free, nearly 10 months now. :) Haven't reached "Pouncing Tiger" form yet, but getting there. Atleast the cat's out of the cage roaming its newfound territory, just waiting to get strong enough to get back to hunting. I hope you get that :D

My anxiety's at an all time low and I'm swimming a lot nowadays too. Really enjoy being outside and sharing fun times with my family 100% sober.

Unfortunately I've started smoking cigarettes again. I quit cigs to help me quit weed. But now I no longer want anything to do with weed, so I guess it's ok. It's unhealthy I know, but it helps with the depression/anxiety a lot especially when I have to meet people.

Say no to weed guys. It's possible. After 10 months, I don't miss it at all.

Thanks again wakinglife. I owe you big time. It was your posts that started me off in this journey, and now, I no longer depend on weed to live my life.

The Malayan Tiger
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#2542

Postby dannyb80 » Mon Aug 13, 2018 7:39 pm

Hi guys, have been reading this thread on and off for a couple years and it has been great following some of you... especially obviously waking life and the progress he has had with quitting the weed. I've been pretty much a daily smoker of weed since I was 17 and I'm now 37 so a very long time, and I'm dependant on it.

I've tried to quit many times, and although I've had some mini breaks here and there I've never been able to fully quit and always find my way back to smoking again. It's been so hard and deep down I know I really need to. I feel it has robbed me in certain areas of my life, socially and also in relationships etc and many other things but I'll spare going into detail as many of you probably have had the same issues.

I'm heavily depressed and I think the weed is actually making my mental problems worse, to the point i've actually been having thoughts of suicide. I've been to a doctor but it has not really helped. I guess I just need to man up and get through this, I'm just very worried for myself that my depression will get a lot worse without it, I feel like I'm in a vicious circle.

Today Monday 13th August 2018 I'm going to try and quit for good, this is my first day without weed.
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#2543

Postby Startingfresh » Tue Aug 14, 2018 3:24 am

Hey dannyb80.

I smoke for 12 yrs in a row. I been off for 5 weeks. Its gonna be rough the first month. Just be ready for all the withdrawal.. Download this app it help me a lot its call its smoke free. Its track how much money you saved daily and it give you some mission for the next 30 days. Just take it one day at a time. First two weeks you need to bunker down eat every three hour and sleep. Next two week walk around do sone exercise and read the bible daily. If you can smoke daily you can read daily too. Good luck my man. I gotta said it feels good to be smoke free.

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#2544

Postby Rikagain » Tue Aug 14, 2018 5:38 pm

Hello Danny, how did your first day go? Did you get through it?
If you can do one day you can do two, etc etc. Take it one day at a time and don't be too hard on yourself, it's not a case of manning up, it's a matter of getting over an addiction.

I smoked for 30 years, thanks to this thread and the wonderful people on here I'm just coming up to 18 months cannibis free.
I was feeling so depressed for about two years prior to giving up, now I feel a 1000 times better, and started to feel the benefits of quitting after only several days.

Obviously I don't know you but I'm sure weed is a huge factor in your depression. As for feeling suicidal please talk to your family and friends, they can be a huge help, you don't have to feel embarrassed about it, they won't judge you, they're probably worried about you.

Going for a walk, meditation, learning something new, writing things down and reading the posts on here can all help with your quit. You CAN do it!!

Good luck, much peace to you,

Rik.
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#2545

Postby Cali-Detroit » Wed Aug 15, 2018 2:18 am

Hey Danny, welcome. Your story resonates very strongly with me, as Im about the same age and have experienced almost exactly what you described. It definitely has held me back in so many areas of life, and I regret ever starting. I think any substance, once it stops working, can lead you into despair. We've altered brain chemistry, pure and simple.

I'm 4 months clean now, and have hit a serious lull. It's a roller coaster, and suicidal thoughts are ever present, albeit weaker now.
I actually Goggled some photos of the different methods, like real fkn pictures. It's weird, it kinda stopped those thoughts dead in their tracks (no pun intended.). I can't help but think that once you cross that threshold, that's it. You're out of the game and there's no more chances.

There's hope it seems, but it's going to take time. At least thats what I read here and six months to a year is a pretty common benchmark. My biggest fear is that it never gets better and I just suffer for the rest of my life. No lie, weed saved my life many times. I mean it worked for me when I didn't totally abuse it, but I always gets away from me.

Anyway, it's a rough road so far, and the first couple weeks will be bad. Try to excercise daily. It's really the only thing that works for me so far. Change is hard at this age, but it can be done.
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#2546

Postby Bagobones » Wed Aug 15, 2018 8:51 am

dannyb80 wrote:Hi guys, have been reading this thread on and off for a couple years and it has been great following some of you... especially obviously waking life and the progress he has had with quitting the weed. I've been pretty much a daily smoker of weed since I was 17 and I'm now 37 so a very long time, and I'm dependant on it.

I've tried to quit many times, and although I've had some mini breaks here and there I've never been able to fully quit and always find my way back to smoking again. It's been so hard and deep down I know I really need to. I feel it has robbed me in certain areas of my life, socially and also in relationships etc and many other things but I'll spare going into detail as many of you probably have had the same issues.

I'm heavily depressed and I think the weed is actually making my mental problems worse, to the point i've actually been having thoughts of suicide. I've been to a doctor but it has not really helped. I guess I just need to man up and get through this, I'm just very worried for myself that my depression will get a lot worse without it, I feel like I'm in a vicious circle.

Today Monday 13th August 2018 I'm going to try and quit for good, this is my first day without weed.


Hello!

I smoked longer and probably more than you. I had it for free for the last 15 years, from the dispenseries in USA, coffee shops of Holland and the cannabis clubs of Spain..

Why dont you make a thread with your own journey. I would love to read it. A couple of tips for you. Listen to AA, NA, MA and all of those. Dont quit for good since your having trouble. Quit one day at a time. Quit one hour at a time. Forever is a very long time and can be overwhelming for a quitter.

You say you have been reading here for 2 years and have tried to quit and started again over and over. I was a cold turkey quitter, so what ill say now is things i have been told, not my own experiences. But I also have seen it up close since its a couple of good friends. Number one, celebrate the time you managed to stay off weed, dont beat yourself up for "failing". Since your "heavly deppressed" as you say, beating yourself up is a trait of depressed people. I know its hard, but try. Your brain can also be trained, so celebrate it, and your brain will slowly start to learn what its supposed to du when you have been so awesome and amazing and managed to stay away for some time.. Dont confuse it and make weed part of the celebration.. hehe..

Get back on the horse fast. If you smoke after a few days sober, try to get a few sober days inn again fast. Being sober is also a game of changing your habbits. That time you have spent sober is counting towards habbit building and building experiences, and especially if you manage to jump inn again and and do a couple of days again fast, within a week or a few days.. It does not work if you quit for 3 days, then smoke for 4 months, then 5 days clean then 2 months. 2 days clean, one day smoking, and so on. Like cutting down on anything really. Coffee, cigarettes, weed, whatever.. And celebrate your small successes..

Many smart people say you are what you think. So when you tell yourself over and over that weed is making your depression worst, then it will make it worst. And then you worry that quitting will also make it worst. Your setting yourself up for failure. Damned if you do, damned if you don't.. Its even an expression for what your doing to yourself. Your already in a sea of pain by the sound of it, will it really make any difference if your having a tortured soul sitting in your couch or whatever your doing while suffering, or feeling that torture while running, while going for a walk, while meditating? Will it make a difference if you dont smoke? Why dont you punish yourself some more by taking away the weed, and go feel some real pain in a fighting gym? Whats the point of smoking? Why dont you put that deppressive thinking toward the weed itself, and tell yourself its no point in smoking it? You say the doctor is not working so you dont go, but the best weed in the world is not workning for you either, so why dont you quit that too, like you have done with the doctor? Its just giving you more deppression and pain anyway, so why give it the effort? its as useless as the doctor and you know it. Why dont you torture yourself by quitting weed and go to the doctor instead? none of them work anyways and are a pain to you, so the endgame is the same for you. Why does one have to go and the other your keeping?

You can just as well quit weed, because its just making you deppressed. Take the pain of quitting, because its just depression awaiting you during withdrawals and PAWS.. That your used to. That you know. Punish your self some more and take away the weed mate....
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#2547

Postby Bagobones » Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:57 am

Cali-Detroit wrote:I actually Goggled some photos of the different methods, like real fkn pictures..


Dude, WTF cali? Stop googling that sh**. Do I have to travel to cali and take away your google?? hehe

Cali your not allowed to do that! Bagobones say no to you. Stop it. Your humour is needed in this f.cked up world. And you with a 2 years sober brain is going to be GREATNESS!! Pure awesomeness!!

I am really proud of you dude.. Keep going.. 6 more months is over so fast, and good things are awaiting you. Your efforts will reward you bigtime! Your no different than the dozens of other heavy Cali or BC users here that has made it to the other side. They all report great things. No one reports that they are regretting quitting after some years..

If you continue to google, do it on a PC that other family members see your googling history. That will get you into some trouble and a very akward situation. Try that and see what happens...
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#2548

Postby Cali-Detroit » Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:27 pm

Hi bones!

Good to hear from you...yes I know it's not a good thing to do, but the night time is a bad time still. Used to be my favorite time...

Sick as it sounds, it shocked me out if my state of mind. But that's enough, no more, promise.

Thanks for the kind words...I'm hoping it gets better. I've hit a big bump at 4 months here. The self employment game isn't working so well ATM. I'm looking at getting a straight job, at low pay no doubt. Oh well. The normal stresses of everyday life are now magnified and there is no more chemical assistance, nothing.

Keeping the faith...
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#2549

Postby Bagobones » Fri Aug 17, 2018 1:57 pm

Cali-Detroit wrote:I'm hoping it gets better. I've hit a big bump at 4 months here. The self employment game isn't working so well ATM. I'm looking at getting a straight job, at low pay no doubt. Oh well. The normal stresses of everyday life are now magnified and there is no more chemical assistance, nothing.

Keeping the faith...


hehe, you keep hoping and i'll keep knowing. You will have your head back for sure!

Well, it takes some time for the THC to be out of your system. Hardcore smokers test positive for THC months after we quit. Even though it's been 4 months since you smoked, you probably have just recently become clean in your body. Its now your brain really is completely empty of weed, so now your spoilt rotten THC brain is really screaming and rebelling! :) So now it needs to grow back some reseptors to reach homeostasis, while its bombing you with your fight or flight mode! Beautiful lsnt it? :)

It is what it is. Time is your doctor. Concentrate on taking one day at a time, and get yourself passed that 6 months mark. Thats why AA and those groups have that one day at a time thing. When you feel like this 6 more months seems soooo far away and unreachable. And time seems to stand still. The thought of 8 more months of this is so depressing and seem so long, so just take it day by day, minute by minute... It will come. Good things will come for your mental state. Good laughs and really enjoying music again is closer and closer every minute and every day. Just concentate on the now. Tomorrow has not happened yet and yesterday is gone..

I really really look foreward to that message that WILL be written by you where you say you had a really good month... The user helenadoc just wrote hers a day or two ago. Her message had optimism again. Cleanofgreen wrote his a long time ago now. I wrote mine a year and a half ago. Oldskoolru wrote his many years ago, and his tale is a legend! Transformer wrote his in february 2017. Walkinglife over a decade ago. soberchic a long time ago.. Sweetdaddyjones has written his message. reckoning is getting there, and SoulFull is reporting good things. I could write this list forever...

You WILL write yours too.. I am not hoping on your behalf, I am knowing....
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