I don't know whats going on?? why do i feel this way?

#15

Postby jurplesman » Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:42 am

Severijn wrote:About 8.3 % of people in the US have diabetes I or II; I don't know if hypoglycemia is included in that number. About 10 to 15 % of people get depression over their lifetime.
Even if diabetes/hypoglycemia is always and directly the cause of depression, there's still about 2 to 7 % of people that have depression that do not have any kind of problems with their blood sugar. But I doubt that people with hypoglycemia always have depression, necessarily. Correlation does not necessarily imply causation.


I don't know where you got these figure from, but some authors show that about 11% of US citizens have diabetes II in 2009 Source

It is true that not all hypoglycemic people are depressed, but after more than 30 years experience working in psychonutritional medicine I have found that vast majority of depressed people - and for that matter other clients with mood disorders - were found to be hypoglycemic following a four-hour Glucose Tolerance Test.

Also take note that although a GTT may be negative, a person could still have all the symptoms of hypoglycemia as explained in Type 6 Hypoglycemia.

It must be emphasized that hypoglycemia is not the only factor in mood disorders, but that there are many other silent diseases that account for mood disorders. See:
Silent Diseases and Mood Disorders

Please also have a look at: Various references for mood orders and nutrition

About 25% of US adults have a mental illness Source
Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine showing 82 studies that  link hypoglycemia (insulin resistance) with depression.... here.

Here are some studies that show an association between depression and insulin resistance source

In his studies of twelve hundred hypoglycemic patients, Stephen Gyland, M.D., found that 86 percent were depressed Gyland

Psychonutritional therapy departs from the conventional approach to the treatment of mood disorders in that it FIRSTLY assesses and treats biological factors and then later on will take "psycho-socilal factors" into consideration if at all necessary.
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#16

Postby Severijn » Sat Oct 01, 2011 11:58 am

Interesting facts and figures; and I am becoming more and more interested in nutritional therapy, although I still belief, speaking from my own experience, that you overestimate the amount of people with depression that is solely being caused by hypoglycemia. But then again, I am only in my first year of psychology class and you have vastly more experience.

But, since lastflower161 said she has hypoglycemia, trying the hypog. diet seems like a good idea to me. Have you ever tried changing your diet lastflower?
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#17

Postby jurplesman » Sun Oct 02, 2011 3:43 am

Severijn wrote:depression that is solely being caused by hypoglycemia.


As I said hypoglycemia is not only factor although a major one. Your psychology course does not usually cover biological psychology, so it won't help you much in your career or in the treatment of "abnormal psychology". It is becoming an outdated profession.
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#18

Postby Annie7788 » Sun Oct 02, 2011 4:21 am

paulo111 wrote:
The theory goes with hypoglycemia you struggle to create enought ATP that is required to convert amino acids into neurotransmitters. So at one point you may get jitters/anxiety after sugar or fasting, you may also have day to day anxiety/depression as you havent enough seretonin. Are you insulin resistant? Or could it be the stress impacting on your adrenals that is causing hypoglycemia? Or mineral deficienices? etc. If you are stressed supporting your adrenals is vital or you can become very sick. I get annoyed when people just tell us to think postively and our thought patterns will automatically change and the depression/anxiety is gone just like magic. Neurotransmitters go a long way to dictate your personality and thought patters - when they go out of sync due to hypoglycemia, hypothyroidism etc, your thought patterns suffer to. The key is to get the body producing the feel good neurotransmitters naturally again, not hoping to talk your way out of it. If we could just adopt a positive attitude and think our way out of it we'd all be cured in no time. The fact some people have had depression for 30 years + tells you perhaps its a bit more technical than some of this forum want us to beleive.


Having been sceptical in the past, I have to say that I now agree. As someone who suffers from Winter SAD whenever I don't have enough exposure during the Summer, I have to agree that there is a strong basis for most depression and anxiety being related to chemical/wiring issues rather than life traumas (although of course the whole lot is interconnected and to a great extent inseperable). What really made me see this is that I gave up meat for over a year (carried on eating fish) and I simply did not feel those winter blues last Autumn (and it's not like I didn't have problems or that I had excess sunshine last year). I've started eating some meat now (as happiness aside, the rest of my body it seems needs it) and last week I had to haul the Lite pod out as I was feeling anxious every day for no good reason.

Whatever we go through in life is tough but bearable if we have the "happy" chemical balance in our bodies. Things go wrong but it doesn't feel like a crashing burden. So I think diet/nutritional issues are definitely worth exploring, but it's not easy to work out a solution just like that (as everyone is different) and it can also take some time to feel the effects.

What can help is realising that it isn't real. If you realise your feelings are not real then you can try to distance yourself from them. It doesn't make them go away, but it can help you cope with them to some extent.
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#19

Postby jurplesman » Sun Oct 02, 2011 5:39 am

Hi Annie7788,

In the case SAD, what is missing is vitamin D, or the sunshine vitamin. This goes to show that in order for the body to produce feel good neurotransmitters it needs an whole array of nutrients , vitamins, minerals and "sunshine" for its vitamin D, to produce the feel good chemicals AND ..... ATP from glucose.
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#20

Postby Annie7788 » Sun Oct 02, 2011 10:34 am

jurplesman wrote:Hi Annie7788,

In the case SAD, what is missing is vitamin D, or the sunshine vitamin. This goes to show that in order for the body to produce feel good neurotransmitters it needs an whole array of nutrients , vitamins, minerals and "sunshine" for its vitamin D, to produce the feel good chemicals AND ..... ATP from glucose.


Yes and I think that my body for some reason does not absorb enough of certain vitamins from food, so perhaps the extra fish changed the balance. I think maybe I have a shortage of some amino acid that helps me absorb as much as I should. I have a history of food intolerance and I can't tolerate a number of supplements (such as vitamin B12) as they usually send me to sleep. So I am very careful what I eat (especially avoiding processed high salt food). I can't take the high strength fish oils as I end up happy but bloated. I tried 5HTP once and ended up with heart palpitations. So my best options seem to be the sad lamp, exercise and keeping it real :)
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#21

Postby jurplesman » Mon Oct 03, 2011 3:50 am

Hi Annie7788,

Malabsorption problems is a major problem for people with mood disorders. It may pay to have yourself tested for digestive disorders such as Crohn's Disease, Celiac Disease, IBS, etc. A good home test is:

Finding your Allergies
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#22

Postby lastflower161 » Fri Oct 28, 2011 12:24 am

hypoglisemia sorry think thats spelt wrong?
thats not the reason i feel this way.. its beacuse i was hurt..
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