Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome (PAWS)

#45

Postby Salsa » Sat Jan 17, 2015 10:39 am

Nate, I went through your posts again. Our symptoms are so much similar. That awful brain fog, lightheaded dizziness, feeling like being drunk ... I hate that the most. Why can't we have a clear head? It's anxiety man. I'm on SSRI (Lexapro, 5 mg) for around 15 days and GAD somehow decreased but I'm still far, far away from being good. I have a very tough exam in a few weeks so I won't raise my dose yet, but then I might go to 10 mg. I just want to be free from these symptoms.

BTW, approaching 13 months.
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#46

Postby Ade,wales » Tue Jan 20, 2015 1:34 am

i am recommending to everyone to read Bevanos post 165
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#47

Postby fiveweeks » Fri Jan 30, 2015 2:09 am

This topic is one of the best if not the best of this site. I've lost count of how many times I've searched and opened this topic looking comfort for the moment I 'm living. This topic is complete, it talks about the symptoms of PAWS clearly, always reminding me that I am not an alien suffering for things that no one and not often me understand sometimes, and a wonderful story of overcoming.

Hey RU! Thank you very much, you really inspires me. This topic is really a lifesaver, resurrected my hope this time, thx, thx!

Jesus bless~
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#48

Postby NoProblem » Mon Oct 10, 2016 6:32 pm

I wanted to bump this post and bring it to light for those currently going through acute withdrawals and post-acute withdrawal syndrome (typically between 3-6 months and beyond). Stumbling upon this thread the other day, it really opened my eyes to a lot and I hope it can do the same for newer users or those that have never come across this.

I can definitely relate. I am just over 6 months clean and it has been one hell of a rollercoaster ride. I can't say I have had one day of feeling completely normal, but I have sporadic moments where I feel like nothing ever happened only to be met by anxiety once again. I feel like I am suffering from borderline panic disorder (biggest issue right now) and minor agoraphobia (if that's even possible). Certain things trigger panic thoughts and create fear and apprehension. All of this started after the acute phase of my withdrawals. I have moments where I feel like I can take on the world (very few, but gradually increasing) and then I have my typical anxiety ridden fear of irrational things. I keep forcing myself to do things and prove that panic is created internally, but I hope this is just PAWS. It seems like PAWS lingers for a very long time.

Another interesting thing I have noted, but I cannot be 100% sure about is the effect of THC on GABA within the brain. GABA is a key acid which helps calm the central nervous system. Some research I have found lingering on Google suggests that THC lowers the GABA count within the brain after excessive use thus resulting in severe anxiety and panic symptoms. Typically, when faced with a panic scenario or panic thoughts, GABA would take over and calm you down. When depleted, the CNS gets over-excited and trails into anxiety and panic with no method to calm. Medications such as benzodiazepines (Xanax, Valium, etc.) work by binding to the GABA-A (or B?) receptor and mimic a similar response. That's why they calm you down. Ah, just my mind wandering looking for answers haha.

I hope this thread can help others. Keep fighting the good fight!
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#49

Postby netty28661 » Mon Oct 10, 2016 6:53 pm

Hi noproblem - I have to say this thread is a brilliant thread for anyone quitting. Not least because I'm in there, in & amongst,lol.

Anything olskoolru has written or contributed to is definately worth reading.

Jannette
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#50

Postby olskoolru » Tue Oct 11, 2016 3:33 am

Happy that this thread is still helping. It took me a long time to find out what was actually happening to me. Information was very hard to come across, so when I found something, I would post it here.

Don't lose hope and stay strong!
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#51

Postby olskoolru » Sat Apr 14, 2018 8:13 pm

fiveweeks wrote:This topic is one of the best if not the best of this site. I've lost count of how many times I've searched and opened this topic looking comfort for the moment I 'm living. This topic is complete, it talks about the symptoms of PAWS clearly, always reminding me that I am not an alien suffering for things that no one and not often me understand sometimes, and a wonderful story of overcoming.

Hey RU! Thank you very much, you really inspires me. This topic is really a lifesaver, resurrected my hope this time, thx, thx!

Jesus bless~


Hey FiveWeeks

You still out there? Was wondering how everything turned out. Been a while.

Ru
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#52

Postby Wave » Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:00 pm

olskoolru wrote:Happy that this thread is still helping. It took me a long time to find out what was actually happening to me. Information was very hard to come across, so when I found something, I would post it here.


Too true, its insane that this is a general addiction forum and like 95% of the people that post are asking/seeking advice on cannabis addiction!!

I think it is extremely important to realise what PAWS is the understand the duration and effects and I would say played a huge part in any failures I have had with quitting bud.

Keep you head in the game and ride it out!!
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#53

Postby netty28661 » Sun Apr 15, 2018 12:58 pm

Hi olskoolru

It's ages since I've been on here, but had an EM notification that this amazing thread is still active & helping people!

How are you doing? It's a good few years since we were going through the worst of withdrawal.

It'll be 6 years this month since I quit & it still feels good!!!!

Jannette
x
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#54

Postby dhae2604 » Sun Apr 15, 2018 6:20 pm

Hi Thanks both of you long term quitter. pls dont forgot to login here
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#55

Postby reckoning » Mon Apr 16, 2018 5:31 am

Wow this was said way back in 2013 in this thread, yet it speaks right to me today. Such a great reminder and as someone has already pointed out such a good thread. Thanks whoever raised this thread. Thanks to all who have contributed to it.

The longer I stay on this site the more I learn how to use it and recognise what an amazing resource is here , apart from all the incredible people.

I especially like the reminder in the post below "That what I am doing is enough". Timely. I'm three and half months into this quit, 106 days. I needed to hear these words today.

olskoolru wrote:I will copy and paste any information regarding PAWS, that I come across, on this thread.

Post Acute Withdrawal comes AFTER Acute Withdrawal or as I like to call it "WTF??!!!"

The Symptoms of Post-Acute Withdrawal
The most common post-acute withdrawal symptoms are:
•Mood swings
•Anxiety
•Irritability
•Tiredness
•Variable energy
•Low enthusiasm
•Variable concentration
•Disturbed sleep

Post-acute withdrawal feels like a rollercoaster of symptoms. In the beginning, your symptoms will change minute to minute and hour to hour. Later as you recover further they will disappear for a few weeks or months only to return again. As you continue to recover the good stretches will get longer and longer. But the bad periods of post-acute withdrawal can be just as intense and last just as long.

Each post-acute withdrawal episode usually last for a few days. Once you've been in recovery for a while, you will find that each post-acute withdrawal episode usually lasts for a few days. There is no obvious trigger for most episodes. You will wake up one day feeling irritable and have low energy. If you hang on for just a few days, it will lift just as quickly as it started. After a while you'll develop confidence that you can get through post-acute withdrawal, because you'll know that each episode is time limited.

Post-acute withdrawal usually lasts for 2 years. This is one of the most important things you need to remember. If you're up for the challenge you can get though this. But if you think that post-acute withdrawal will only last for a few months, then you'll get caught off guard, and when you're disappointed you're more likely to relapse. (Reference: http://www.AddictionsAndRecovery.org)

How to Survive Post-Acute Withdrawal

Be patient. You can't hurry recovery. But you can get through it one day at a time. If you resent post-acute withdrawal, or try to bulldoze your way through it, you will become exhausted. And when you're exhausted you will think of using to escape.

Post-acute withdrawal symptoms are a sign that your brain is recovering. Therefore don't resent them. But remember, even after one year, you are still only half way there.

Go with the flow. Withdrawal symptoms are uncomfortable. But the more you resent them the worse they'll seem. You'll have lots of good days over the next two years. Enjoy them. You'll also have lots of bad days. On those days, don't try to do too much. Take care of yourself, focus on your recovery, and you'll get through this.

Practice self-care. Give yourself lots of little breaks over the next two years. Tell yourself "what I am doing is enough." Be good to yourself. That is what most addicts can't do, and that's what you must learn in recovery. Recovery is the opposite of addiction.

Sometimes you'll have little energy or enthusiasm for anything. Understand this and don't over book your life. Give yourself permission to focus on your recovery.

Post-acute withdrawal can be a trigger for relapse. You'll go for weeks without any withdrawal symptoms, and then one day you'll wake up and your withdrawal will hit you like a ton of bricks. You'll have slept badly. You'll be in a bad mood. Your energy will be low. And if you're not prepared for it, if you think that post-acute withdrawal only lasts for a few months, or if you think that you'll be different and it won't be as bad for you, then you'll get caught off guard. But if you know what to expect you can do this.

Being able to relax will help you through post-acute withdrawal. When you're tense you tend to dwell on your symptoms and make them worse. When you're relaxed it's easier to not get caught up in them. You aren't as triggered by your symptoms which means you're less likely to relapse.

Remember, every relapse, no matter how small undoes the gains your brain has made during recovery. Without abstinence everything will fall apart. With abstinence everything is possible. (Reference: http://www.AddictionsAndRec
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#56

Postby Wave » Mon Apr 16, 2018 10:32 pm

reckoning wrote:Wow this was said way back in 2013 in this thread, yet it speaks right to me today. Such a great reminder and as someone has already pointed out such a good thread. Thanks whoever raised this thread. Thanks to all who have contributed to it.


You can do this bro, hang in there!
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#57

Postby HDog455 » Tue Apr 17, 2018 1:47 am

I especially agree with the following from the article posted above - I've been pushing these two points for years:-

"Go with the flow. Withdrawal symptoms are uncomfortable. But the more you resent them the worse they'll seem. You'll have lots of good days over the next two years. Enjoy them. You'll also have lots of bad days. On those days, don't try to do too much. Take care of yourself, focus on your recovery, and you'll get through this."

"Remember, every relapse, no matter how small undoes the gains your brain has made during recovery. Without abstinence, everything will fall apart. With abstinence everything is possible. "
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#58

Postby Bagobones » Tue Apr 17, 2018 4:03 am

netty28661 wrote:Hi olskoolru

It's ages since I've been on here, but had an EM notification that this amazing thread is still active & helping people!

How are you doing? It's a good few years since we were going through the worst of withdrawal.

It'll be 6 years this month since I quit & it still feels good!!!!

Jannette
x


Your awesome Janette, you know that? hehe. You inspired me alot with my quit.
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#59

Postby Bagobones » Tue Apr 17, 2018 4:27 am

HDog455 wrote:I especially agree with the following from the article posted above - I've been pushing these two points for years:-

"Go with the flow. Withdrawal symptoms are uncomfortable. But the more you resent them the worse they'll seem. You'll have lots of good days over the next two years. Enjoy them. You'll also have lots of bad days. On those days, don't try to do too much. Take care of yourself, focus on your recovery, and you'll get through this."

"Remember, every relapse, no matter how small undoes the gains your brain has made during recovery. Without abstinence, everything will fall apart. With abstinence everything is possible. "


I mostly agree. But I had some luck killing bad days with "insane" activities. Like hard thai boxing training, including taking a bad beating fighting bigger stronger people killed my paws.
Like I had a bad paws day, and went on my bike to town. I crashed bad that day.. hehehe.. Paws went away and was replaced by a bleeding knee and a blue shoulder. :D

Same with "insane" places. I volunteer with refugees during one of the blood bath wars of 2017. 1 million civilians displaced, and a city bombed to rubbles with airplanes and mortar..
I felt like absolutely sh** when I arrived there, but a couple of 9 year old victims of war took it away within a minute...

My theory is that if you give your brain bigger issues to work with than the paws, it will go away..
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