Eye colour change through hypnosis?

Postby darmos653 » Tue Apr 19, 2016 11:28 am

I read somewhere that someone's eye colour can be changed by using hypnosis, with the qualifier that it can only be changed to natural colours like blue, brown, green, hazel because the subconscious won't act on something that isn't actually possible.

Is there anyone here who can confirm that it is indeed possible to change eye colour using hypnosis?

btw it wasn't some crazy sales thing it was just an article.
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#1

Postby saladinsmith » Tue Apr 19, 2016 2:57 pm

This is not something I've ever tried, so I could be wrong.

A person can certainly be hypnotized into thinking that their eye color has changed. This might even be the one and only effect of eye-color-changing hypnosis mp3s.

The pupil of the eye naturally expands and contracts in response to light (and focal length, and drugs), which causes the pigments in the iris to compress or spread out, which can cause a color change in certain people -- so you will hear of people who have one eye color in bright light, and another eye color when the light is dimmer. With such people, I imagine you could get them to expand or contract their pupils on command with hypnosis, so you could change their eye color temporarily in that way. However, if their eyes usually change from hazel to blue, you couldn't make them green.

I don't think it's possible to take any person off the street and make their eyes whatever (natural) color they want permanently. But I could be wrong.
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#2

Postby darmos653 » Tue Apr 19, 2016 3:43 pm

Well thanks though I'm still pretty much in the dark about it myself. Was really hoping someone could clarify it clearly one way or the other. Not btw because I want to change my eye colour but because if it could actually be done it would confirm that the power of hypnosis and the mind generally is way underestimated.

Still hoping that someone can definitively say whether it's actually possible or not, not just making someone think that their eyes have changed colour but actually doing it.
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#3

Postby saladinsmith » Tue Apr 19, 2016 3:56 pm

darmos653 wrote:it would confirm that the power of hypnosis and the mind generally is way underestimated.

I can confirm that. :)

I'm always a little skeptical of people saying that hypnosis can make physical changes to the body though. Like hypnosis for larger breasts, or hypnosis to grow taller. Sometimes supposedly "physical" illnesses have been cured with hypnosis or placebos, but beyond that, I don't think much of it. Amazing as hypnosis is, it's not magic.
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#4

Postby darmos653 » Wed Apr 20, 2016 12:04 pm

Yes I also think that people who make claims about hypnosis being able to enlarge breasts, grow taller etc are on very thin ice and whether they know it or not are doing a disservice to hypnosis generally.

However I felt that I had grounds for genuine curiosity about the changing eye colour thing because I've read enough accounts about (though have not actually seen) things like people being put into quite deep trance then being told that an object, say a pencil, is actually a piece of metal which has had its tip heated red hot then when the subject's arm is lightly touched with the pencil a small burn actually physically appears on the arm.

That to me suggests - if it's true - the power of the subconscious mind to cause physical change.
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#5

Postby saladinsmith » Wed Apr 20, 2016 2:23 pm

That's another thing I'm skeptical of. From G.H. Estabrooks book, Hypnotism:
For example, the older hypnotists claimed many remarkable things about hypnotism. One of these was the ability of the subject to raise blisters under suggestion. The standard practice was to put a bandage on the subject's wrist and suggest to him very strongly that the bandage was a mustard plaster which would shortly produce a blister and strange to say, in many cases the suggestion was successful. An actual blister might not always appear but the skin under the bandage would become very inflamed and red, blood appearing in many cases. Then some experimenters became suspicious. They left the subject in the room by himself but kept him under close scrutiny through a peep-hole. It was then found that the subject, in his great desire to co-operate, was playing tricks on the hypnotist. He would deliberately rub the bandage with all his strength so as to irritate the skin beneath. Worse still, some subjects were seen to take a needle, thrust it in under the bandage, and break the skin in this manner.` Yet, when awake, these same subjects were models of honesty and even when questioned in hypnotism they would deny all knowledge of trickery.

It's another thing I haven't personally tried, so I could be wrong, and I've known Estabrooks to be wrong in the past, but it's not something I presently believe in.
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#6

Postby darmos653 » Wed Apr 20, 2016 2:53 pm

I'd agree and anyone with any critical thinking ability couldn't/wouldn't just accept that such things are "true" (unless they'd seen it with their own eyes and knew that fraud couldn't have been involved) but on the other hand there is such a huge wealth of anecdotal and apparently also documented research which points to the ability of the mind to cause actual physical change in the body.

Like you I can't accept something like that till I've seen it with my own eyes, but also am disinclined to believe that it's ALL fraud and hype.
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#7

Postby Bloof » Thu Apr 18, 2019 1:08 am

I guess you could be convinced through a delusion that they're a different color? because I don't think its feasibly possible to change eye color using the mind alone. Unless there are scientific papers to show thats possible I doubt it.
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#8

Postby Richard@DecisionSkills » Thu Apr 18, 2019 10:16 am

Given eye color changes for a variety of reasons, including changes in light conditions or emotions, e.g. when angry, it would stand to reason that claim can be made that hypnosis can be used.

This doesn’t mean hypnosis is the direct cause, but that in the process of hypnosis the subject started with pupils of a certain size and a certain emotional state. Later in the process of hypnosis the pupils have changed size, the emotional state is different and therefore a slight color change has also taken place.

As for the idea that someone can use hypnosis to make a significant, lasting change to eye color, that is in the same trash bin as hypnosis growing breasts.

https://flei.com/the-science-of-eye-color/
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#9

Postby jimmyh » Thu Apr 18, 2019 5:13 pm

Bloof wrote:I guess you could be convinced through a delusion that they're a different color? because I don't think its feasibly possible to change eye color using the mind alone. Unless there are scientific papers to show thats possible I doubt it.


How cautious of you. I think you're almost certainly right, though I haven't checked the science either.


Richard@DecisionSkills wrote:As for the idea that someone can use hypnosis to make a significant, lasting change to eye color, that is in the same trash bin as hypnosis growing breasts.


This is almost too good. Your statement about growing breasts, at least if you trust the science... is empirically false. Here are all of the relevant results form the first three pages of google scholar. All positive.

doi/abs/10.1080/00029157.1977.10403876
doi/abs/10.1080/00224497409550865
doi/abs/10.1080/00029157.1977.10403875
doi/abs/10.1080/00029157.1978.10403953
doi/abs/10.1080/00029157.1960.10401817?journalCode=ujhy20
pubmed/5265056

(I originally tried to use the full URL, but I got the error message "Your message contains too many URLs", hah)

Man, I almost feel bad for you, since it's such a reasonable sounding guess you made, and I had the same expectations as you did before I looked at the science. I guess it pays to be epistemically cautious like Bloof if you don't like people pointing out when you're empirically wrong. Image
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#10

Postby Richard@DecisionSkills » Thu Apr 18, 2019 10:09 pm

jimmyh wrote: Here are all of the relevant results form the first three pages of google scholar. All positive.


Science does not equal search engine results jimmy. You actually need to read the studies.

Post a relevant study you read that contradicts what I said.
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#11

Postby jimmyh » Thu Apr 18, 2019 11:34 pm

I just posted several, you dingbat. What kind of search engine do you think google scholar is? :lol:
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#12

Postby Richard@DecisionSkills » Fri Apr 19, 2019 1:52 am

jimmyh wrote:I just posted several, you dingbat.


Not sure why you believe name calling is appropriate jimmy. Of course, in a previous thread you posted how proud you were of yourself for calling a front line, minimum wage employee a “douche” so I guess when someone doesn’t agree with you then calling them names makes you feel good.

Post a clickable link of a study you believe relevant.
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#13

Postby jimmyh » Fri Apr 19, 2019 2:32 am

Not sure why you believe name calling is appropriate jimmy.


Because you try to carry yourself as someone who can enjoy the banter and expect to come out ahead, not as someone who is asking to be coddled. If I said something like that I’d expect and want to be called out on it too. Heck, I called *myself* a “dumbass” earlier today because I did something dumb.

Seriously, I’m just having fun here, and in the past you have assured me that you’re having fun too. If it’s not fun for you, just say so.

How would you like to be treated?

Of course, in a previous thread you posted how proud you were of yourself for calling a front line, minimum wage employee a “douche”


Yeah, you’re hallucinating. I dare you to quote me :P

so I guess when you don’t agree with someone then calling them names makes you feel good.

I called you a dingbat because you were acting like you couldn’t tell that I had already done exactly what you asked, and I think you’re smarter than that. Is this something you actually disagree with?

Post a clickable link of a study you believe relevant.


Sure, no problem. Tell me that you struggle to copy and paste the doi info into the browser bar and click the top result, and I will Image
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#14

Postby Richard@DecisionSkills » Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:24 am

jimmyh wrote:
Not sure why you believe name calling is appropriate jimmy.


Because you try to carry yourself as someone who can enjoy the banter and expect to come out ahead, not as someone who is asking to be coddled.


You misunderstand jimmy. I said I’m not sure why you believe it is appropriate. It wasn’t a question, nor was it an appeal for you to modify your behavior. Maybe I could have phrased it better, that I don’t understand what name calling does for you. Again, not a question. It is a self-reflective statement being shared with readers. It gives the readers something to consider.

As for not randomly copying/pasting from any number of links, it is because I value my time jimmy. If there is a study you found most relevant, contribute it to the discussion. I doubt you even read any of the studies you posted. In my opinion, spamming the forum with links and believing somehow that supports whatever case you are trying to make is less effective than name calling.
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